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13 Secrets to Performing Well Under Pressure

Focus on the task

Instead of worrying about the outcome, worry about the task at hand.

That means developing tunnel vision. When you keep your eye on the task at hand (and only the task at hand), all you can see is the concrete steps necessary to excel.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

13 Secrets to Performing Well Under Pressure

13 Secrets to Performing Well Under Pressure

https://www.inc.com/business-insider/13-secrets-to-performing-well-under-pressure.html

inc.com

12

Key Ideas

High-pressure moments as a (fun) challenge

Most people see "pressure situations" as threatening, and that makes them perform even less well. 

But, "when you see the pressure as a challenge, you are stimulated to give the attention and energy needed to make your best effort." 

To practice, build "challenge thinking" into your daily life.

One of many opportunities

Is this high-pressure situation a good opportunity? Sure. Is it the only opportunity you will ever have for the rest of your life? Probably not.

Before an interview or a big meeting, give yourself a pep talk: "I will have other interviews" (or presentations or sales calls). 

Focus on the task

Instead of worrying about the outcome, worry about the task at hand.

That means developing tunnel vision. When you keep your eye on the task at hand (and only the task at hand), all you can see is the concrete steps necessary to excel.

Plan for the worst

"What-if" scenarios can be your friend. By letting yourself play out the worst-case outcomes, you're able to brace yourself for them.

The key here is that you're anticipating the unexpected. Instead of panicking, you'll be able to (better) "maintain your composure and continue your task to the best of your ability."

Take control

In a pressure moment, there are factors you have control over and factors you don't. 

Focus on the factors you can control, not on the "uncontrollables," that could intensify the pressure, increase your anxiety, and ultimately undermine your confidence.

Remember your past success

Remembering your past success ignites confidenceYou did it before, and you can do it again.

Once you're feeling good about yourself, you'll be better able to cut through anxiety and take care of business.

Be positive

Belief in a successful outcome can prevent you from worry that can drain and distract your working memory.

Anxiety and fear are stripped from the equation, allowing you to act with confidence.

Get in touch with your senses

When you're under a deadline and the world feels like it's crashing in, you're particularly prone to making careless errors.

To depressurize the situation, focus on the here and now. Tune into your senses. What do you see? What do you hear? How's your breathing?

Listen to music

By listening to music, you're able to literally distract yourself from your anxiety.

Create a pre-performance routine

The idea here is to create a (brief) routine that you go through in the minutes before you present or perform, Weisinger and Pawliw-Fry suggest.

A "pre-routine" prevents you from becoming distracted, keeps you focused, and puts you in the "zone" by signaling to your body it's time to perform.

Slow down

When you're in a high-pressure situation, it's natural to speed up your thinking. It can lead you to act before you're ready. 

Slow down. Give yourself a second to breathe and formulate a plan. You'll think more flexibly, creatively, attentively, and your work will be all the better for it. 

Share the pressure

Telling someone else about the pressure you're feeling has been proven to reduce anxiety and stress.

Sharing your feelings allows you to examine them, challenge their reality, and view a pressure situation in a realistic manner.

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Remember the "Big Picture"

Thinking Big Picture about the work you do can be very energizing in the face of stress and challenges because you are linking one particular, often small action to a greater meaning or purpose. 

Something that may not seem important or valuable on its own gets cast in a whole new light. 

Rely on Routines

Every time you make a decision, you create a state of mental tension that is, in fact, stressful. 

The solution is to reduce the number of decisions you need to make by using routines. If there's something you need to do every day, do it at the same time every day. Have a routine for preparing for your day in the morning, and packing up to go home at night. Simple routines can dramatically reduce your experience of stress. 

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Resilience

... is the ability to adapt to adversity or significant stress.

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The ability to perceive setbacks as temporary and solvable.

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Finding meaning within chaos is a core component of resilient leadership.

Self-awareness and resilience

Resilient people take the time to understand what they’re feeling, even if it’s uncomfortable.

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