Cognitive Dissonance And Bias - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

The Ben Franklin Effect and Cognitive Dissonance - Exploring your mind

Cognitive Dissonance And Bias

Cognitive dissonance makes our mind try to protect our self-image and the connection between our thoughts and actions by modifying our opinions.

Once the justification or new opinion arises, we become more sensitive to any information that supports it. We also get more skeptical of any information that opposes it.

56 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The Ben Franklin Effect and Cognitive Dissonance - Exploring your mind

The Ben Franklin Effect and Cognitive Dissonance - Exploring your mind

https://exploringyourmind.com/ben-franklin-effect-cognitive-dissonance/

exploringyourmind.com

2

Key Ideas

Cognitive Dissonance And Bias

Cognitive dissonance makes our mind try to protect our self-image and the connection between our thoughts and actions by modifying our opinions.

Once the justification or new opinion arises, we become more sensitive to any information that supports it. We also get more skeptical of any information that opposes it.

Behind The Ben Franklin Effect

The effect works because our brains need to conciliate the fact that we are helping someone with our dislike for them, and the easiest way to do that is to assume we actually like them.

The request creates a contradiction and then discomfort for the person who dislikes you. And that pushes one to readjust their way of thinking. 

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Benjamin Franklin effect

Is a psychological phenomenon that causes us to like someone more after we do that person a favor: We justify our actions to ourselves, that we did them a favor because we liked them.

The cognitive dissonance theory

Suggests that holding 2 or more contradictory beliefs at the same time causes people to experience mental discomfort, which manifests as psychological stress. 

And people will always seek to minimize their cognitive dissonance and the discomfort it creates.

The Benjamin Franklin effect has generally been explained using cognitive dissonance theory.

Essentially, this means that when someone does you a favor, they need to be able to justify...

The Benjamin Franklin effect has generally been explained using cognitive dissonance theory.

Essentially, this means that when someone does you a favor, they need to be able to justify it to themself, in order to avoid the cognitive dissonance that might occur from doing something nice for someone that they dislike.

Using The Benjamin Franklin Effect
  • Remember that the favor matters more than its scope. In most cases, the increase in rapport comes from the fact that the other person does you a favor.
  • Use reciprocity, by pe...
Facts Related To The Ben Franklin Effect
  • Research shows that being kind to someone increases how much you like that person.
  • Being asked a favor can make one feel acknowledged for their expertise, which can cause them to develop more positive feelings toward the person asking for help.
  • The negative Benjamin Franklin effect happens when people who do something negative to someone will increase the degree to which they dislike that person, in order to justify their negative actions to themselves.
The Benjamin Franklin Effect

A psychological phenomenon that causes people to like someone more after they do them a favor, especially if they dislike the helped person. 

You can use it to benefit and protect yourself when interacting with others.

The Benjamin Franklin Effect Mechanism

Some researchers think this effect comes from our need to reconcile us doing someone a favor and us not liking that person, so we assume that we like them. 

Other researchers think that ...

Applying The Benjamin Franklin Effect

Ask for help when you need it, but not too often. 

If you reach a roadblock during a negotiation, ask the investor or negotiating party for a favor and give them a reason to co...

What the Benjamin Franklin Effect is

A person who voluntarily does you a favor is more likely to do you another favor than if they had received a favor from you. 

It means that you grow to like people for whom you do favors for and dislike people you harm.

The fear of ceasing to exist

The idea of no longer existing is more than just "fear of death". It arouses a primary existential anxiety in all normal humans.

The fear of heights or falling is basically the fear of extin...

Mutilation

This is the fear of losing any part of our bodily structure or the thought of having our body's boundaries invaded.

Anxiety about animals, such as bugs, spiders, snakes, and other creepy things arises from fear of mutilation.

Loss of Autonomy

The fear of being immobilized, restricted, overwhelmed, entrapped, smothered, or otherwise controlled by circumstances beyond our control. 

Fear of intimacy, or "fear of commitment," is basically fear of losing one's autonomy.

2 more ideas

The +, -, = system
 Everyone needs to work with someone better than them, equal to them and someone who they can teach.
Taking small steps

Excellence is the gradual result of always striving to do better. It’s about the small steps you can take each day to make a tiny bit of improvement.

Beat resistance
The biggest enemy of progress lies within us: The voice that tells us to work tomorrow, that we are not ready, that we are not good enough.

2 more ideas

The humor effect defined
The humor effect is a psychological phenomenon that causes people to remember information better when that information is perceived as funny or humorous.

The use of humor enhances people’s

Benefits of incorporating humor into learning
  • Humorous information receives increased attention during the perception stage.
  • Improved encoding. Our brain gives preferential treatment to humorous information when it comes to storing it in our memory.
  • The use of humor serves as a distraction from negative emotions, such as anger or anxiety, that people might experience when processing certain information.
  • Reading or viewing something humorous has a positive and energizing effect.
  • Adding humor to the information that you are presenting can make it more interesting to others.
Different types of humor lead to different outcomes

The use of positive, nonaggressive humor is associated with 

  • improved learning outcomes, 
  • a relaxed learning environment, 
  • better student evaluations, 
  • an increased motivation to learn, 
  • improved information recall, 
  • an increased degree of student satisfaction throughout the learning process.

The use of negative or aggressive humor, especially if aimed at particular students, will produce the opposite effect.

one more idea

Specialize

Every field has its standards. Once you’ve got the basics down, reach for a lesser known—but still needed at your office—skill or competency.

Embrace conflict

Don’t create unnecessary conflict with your co-workers, but don’t run from it, either. See it as an opportunity to better understand someone you’ll be spending 40 hours a week around. 

Chances are, the other person will respond the same way. Goodwill is taken for granted less often than you might think.

Ask for help

At first, asking for help might sound like the opposite of creating your own opportunities. 

Opportunities are tied to personal relationships. Consider the Ben Franklin effect: By asking someone for a small favor, you endear them to yourself. The reason is that, when you help someone, your brain rationalizes your actions by assuming that you must like that person.

2 more ideas

Status quo bias
Status quo bias

Status quo bias is when we prefer that our environment and situation should remain unchanged.

The bias has the most impact in the area of decision-making, as we tend to pre...

Common Explanations for Status Quo Bias

These explanations are all irrational for preferring the status quo:

  • Loss Aversion: When we make decisions, we weigh the potential for loss more heavily than the potential for gain.
  • Sunk Costs: We continue to invest resources like time, money, or effort into a specific endeavor just because we are already invested, not because it is the best choice.
  • Cognitive Dissonance: In decision-making, we an option as more valuable once we have chosen it. Considering an alternative can cause cognitive dissonance.
  • Mere Exposure Effect: It states that people prefer something they've been exposed to before.
  • Rationality vs. Irrationality: We may choose to keep our current situation because of the potential transition cost of switching to an alternative. It becomes irrational when we ignore choices that can improve a situation because we want to maintain the status quo.
Status Quo Bias examples
  • When offered several sandwich options, individuals often choose a sandwich they have eaten before.
  • In 1985, Coca Cola reformulated the original Coke flavor and started selling a "New Coke." Although blind taste tests found many consumers preferred New Coke, consumers continued to buy Coke Classic. New Coke was discontinued in 1992.
  • In political elections, the current candidate is more likely to win than the challenger.
Overconfidence bias
Overconfidence bias

Most people think they know more than they really do.

Researchers showed that people believe they understand familiar manufactured objects much better than they really do. ...

The details that form our reality

When we don't understand the details, it can cause much trouble. If a nation is overconfident that they will win a war, they will fight more wars. An investor that is to sure of their estimate of an asset's value will trade too much.

The world is too big to process and understand everything. We have to oversimplify the world to be able to function in it. The difficulty is that we don't think our models of how the world works are oversimplified. We believe they are correct. This creates a hidden risk.

The hidden risk of not understanding the details of our reality

Focusing on specific details in a complex system while ignoring the amount of detail contained within the system may at first show a benefit. However, it can create a massive collapse in the long-run.

In the late 18th century, the German government wanted to grow "scientific forests" to track and harvest timber. Underbrush was cleared, and tree species reduced. The first planting did well because of nutrients that were still left in the soil. But the clearing of underbrush reduced insect, mammal, and bird populations essential to soil building. Pests had few enemies left and infected the entire forest, resulting in massive forest death across the country.

one more idea