Three Missteps found in Group Presentations - Deepstash

Three Missteps found in Group Presentations

  • Each slide looks like it was designed by a different person.
  • Presenters talk over one another.
  • Forgetting that you are “on.” even after your turn is over.

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What to do, and not to do, during a group presentation.

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MORE IDEAS FROM 3 Group Presentation Pitfalls — and How to Avoid Them

An Opportunity To Build Trust

Every presentation is an opportunity to build trust with your audience. The cohesiveness of your group presentation is an indicator to your clients of what their relationship will be like working with you.

For many organizations, group presentations are a part of life. Your team may deliver a group pitch to a new client, or perhaps the capstone exercise of your leadership development program includes a series of group presentations to the head of your business unit.

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When speaking in person, position yourself so that you can reference the slides but speak directly to the audience.

Bring your own personality to the presentation. Personal anecdotes that connect to the audience are a terrific way to build trust between the audience and each member of the group presenting.

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Before the presentation, make time for a complete run-through, with slides.

Specifically, practice your transitions from one person to the next: For example, " Stacey did a great job talking us through the challenges of entering this new market. Now, I’ll provide a few solutions based on our firm’s expertise."

Use a timer to ensure you are keeping to the allotted time, or set a realistic time limit based on the format of your meeting, so you ensure plenty of time to field questions.

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When you add a group presentation to your calendar, block off time to prepare as a group. Use this time to agree on your audience’s level of knowledge about the topic, your specific goal for the presentation, the main message, the general outline and who will present each section before each of you starts writing your individual components.

This helps you avoid the last-minute stress of trying to fit each of your slides into one cohesive unit.

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RELATED IDEA

The origin of 10/20/30 Rule

Guy Kawasaki, the head of marketing at Apple back in the 1980s, discovered the science behind pitching. He calls it the "10/20/30 Rule" and it's based on the principles of clarity and focus. He uses it in every presentation.

And so do some of the most successful brands, since this rule's been used in AirBnb's pitch deck , Buffer's , and YouTube's (plus hundreds more).

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The Data Scientist presentation style

The Data Scientist uses data, analytics, facts, and figures to make his point and persuade the audience. 

Pros: This presentation style delivers data, information and analysis and will almost never be filled with fluff.

Cons: an audience that doesn’t want analytics and searches emotional connection will lose interest quickly.

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You don’t care enough about the audience

Most people think they are the most important player in a presentation. They are wrong. The audience, the listeners, the people watching the presenter are the most important players.

Care about the audience, creating messages and stories that resonate with them and inspire them.

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