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Information storms

Information storms

We often feel overwhelmed when we are exposed to a large volume of information. We also rely on secondary knowledge that does not come from any external source.

To put it another way: rightly or wrongly, we think what other people think. The digital culture has taken this reliance on social information to a new level, with new sets of hazards, anxieties, manipulation and influence.

@adeebschultz

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How misinformation builds
  • When we encounter unfamiliar information on a social network, we verify it in one of two ways. We either go through the burdensome process of countless claims and counter-claims to understand if it is true, or we rely on others by way of social proof.
  • If we search for online information, instead of coming up with our own way of assessing the quality or the usefulness of every website,  we rely on Google's PageRank algorithm to come up with the best sites. In essence, we rely on other people to source information by use of user traffic, reviews, ratings, clicks and likes.
How to handle an infostorm

Infostorms are like actual storms: they are a product of climatic conditions. Different climates can produce different results.

The more we understand the chain of events that led to a particular view, the better we are equipped to appreciate it if we are skeptical or take into account other perspectives.

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RELATED IDEAS

To question and assess the reputation of an information source, ask:
  • Where does it come from?
  • Does the source have a good reputation?
  • Who are the authorities who believe it?
  • What are my reasons for deferring to these authorities?

5

IDEAS

Data in a resume should be connected to the impact you've made.

  • If you're applying for a business role, convey your experience by sharing what you accomplished, how it was measured, and how it was done.
  • It can also apply to relevant leadership positions, university honors, or other types of recognition. However, be sure to do it with humility.

Hedonic adaptation refers to our desire to quickly return to a relatively stable level of happiness after a positive or negative change.

When we get a promotion or buy a new television, we may be happy for a while but will gradually grow accustomed to the choice and privilege they afford.