Your Body is a Clock - Deepstash

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If you're just not a morning person, science says you may never be

Your Body is a Clock

Around 30 to 50 percent of people sleep between the hours of 11 pm and 7 am. Another 40 percents are either slightly morning people or slightly evening people.

To understand why some people are early birds while others are night owls, we have to take into consideration the body's circadian system.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

If you're just not a morning person, science says you may never be

If you're just not a morning person, science says you may never be

https://www.vox.com/2016/3/18/11255942/morning-people-evening-chronotypes-sleeping

vox.com

6

Key Ideas

Early Bird or Night Owls

The body is an orchestra of organs, each providing an essential function. In this metaphor, the circadian rhythm is the conductor. The conductor makes every neurotransmitter, every hormone, and every chemical in the body cycle with the daily rhythm.

This makes us our sleep habits unique and tailored.

Sleep Habits

Being a morning (or evening) person is inborn, genetic, and very hard to change.

Tick Tock

  • Every single cell of the body has clock genes, bits of DNA that flip on and off throughout the day.
  • Like the body as a whole, the cell's metabolism is scheduled for efficiency. Clock genes regulate the expression of between 5 and 20 percent of all the other genes in the cell.

Social Jet Lag

When our personal clock is out of sync with the one of our society, our health suffers. 

Less Sleep is dangerous

It has been associated with higher blood pressure, body mass index, and increased calcification of the coronary artery.

  • In lab experiments, people who slept only five hours a night for one week became less sensitive to insulin, which makes it harder to maintain blood sugar levels.
  • In an overnight sleep study of 1,024 individuals, poor sleep was associated with the misregulation of the hunger hormones leptin and ghrelin.

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Jet lag

Jet Lag is a debility similar to a hangover. Jet Lag derives from the simple fact that jets travel so fast they leave your body rhythms behind.

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We take a few days to adjust

Our bodies take a few days to fully adjust, depending on not only how many time zones have been crossed, but also the direction of travel.

Usually, it would take five or six days to adjust to a six-hour shift in time zone. When you travel east, your body has a shorter time to synchronize with the regular 24-hour sun cycle. When you travel west, your body has extra time to adjust.

Speeding up the adjustment

Generally, the best way to fool your biological clock is to shift your internal rhythms before the flight.

  • Restrict light exposure to specific times.
  • Restrict rest and meals.
  • Adjust activities such as walking and running to specific times.
  • Use melatonin - the hormone that makes us sleepy - in small amounts. However, certain people should avoid melatonin.
Waking Up Late Means Moving Less
Waking Up Late Means Moving Less

Rising early in the day makes an overall difference in the number of steps one walks during the entire day, with the late risers moving around less.

  • Each of us has a...
Our Chronotype

Our various biochemical signals, daily lifestyle, and genetic inclinations develop a specific chronotype in us, that is basically our overall biological response to the outside world.

These chronotypes are categorized as: Morning, Day or Night. The person with a morning chronotype will wake up early in the morning and start to feel hungry sooner than the person with a Day or Night chronotype.

The Body Rhythm

The chronotypes we form are not permanent in most cases but have a rhythm of their own, spawning years, and shifting from Morning to Day and eventually, Night, based on our age.

People with chronotypes that are more towards the evening are more prone to various metabolic disorders and are likely to develop obesity, diabetes and heart disease.

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Your body needs dark too
Your body needs dark too

While we are starting to pay attention to how important sleep is, the need for dark is still mostly ignored.

Being exposed to regular patterns of light and dark regulates our circadian ...

Our sleep and wake patterns

On its own, the circadian rhythm takes almost 24 hours. Our bodies rely on the Sun to reset this cycle and keep it at 24 hours, the length of our days. Light and the dark are important signals for the cycle.

During the night, body temperature drops, metabolism slows, and the hormone melatonin rises dramatically. When the Sun comes up in the morning, melatonin has already started falling, and you wake up.

Our bodies in the dark

During the dark, levels of the hormone leptin (hunger control), go up. This means we do not feel hungry while low levels make us hungry.

Ans research found that sleep disruption and turning on lights lowers leptin levels which makes people hungry in the middle of the night.

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