Memorizing new material

Memorizing new material

When we try to memorize new information, we assume that the more work we put in, the better we will do.

But, our memory for new information is the most fragile just after it has first been encoded. It is more susceptible to interference from further information.

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Take some downtime

Aiming for minimal interference - to do literally nothing - is the best way to consolidate the facts and remember it better.

Research found that short periods of rest increased the ability to recall information up to 30 % in healthy individuals. For people with neurological injury, such as a stroke, the ability to recall after some rest, places them almost within the range of healthy people.

We remember better after rest

When memories are initially encoded, they pass through a period of consolidation that cements them in long-term storage.

It was once thought to happen mostly during sleep; studies have found that it is not limited to sleep, because it happens during periods of wakeful rest, too.

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Being happy is, in big lines, a matter of choice. If you try to pay less attention to everybody else's life on social media and accept the unpleasant moments that life makes you face, you might as well discover that happiness is reachable, as long as you do not make a constant obsession out of it.

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You remember an overall impression

Try to describe a person in detail, and you will find that you remember their general features, but the particular details are challenging to recall.

Remembering the overall impression is an advantage. The details of a face may change from day to day, but the general features will remain - meaning that you can still recognize your friend even with a different hairstyle.

Drawing to remember

Drawing something that you want to remember is more effective than using other memory techniques.

Since drawing involves consideration of a thing from so many different angles (visual, spatial, semantic, and verbal) and also involves motor use, the brain stores a memory in more areas of the brain, thus solidifying it.

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