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How to Be a Better News Consumer

Read past the headlines

People regularly share stories based only on headlines. Five or six words are not enough to tell the entire story.

Researchers found that 59 % of shared news links had never been clicked through and read. When you do share a link, try and share a piece of the content from the article, so people understand why you are reacting to it.

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How to Be a Better News Consumer

How to Be a Better News Consumer

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-to-be-a-better-news-consumer/

scientificamerican.com

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Key Ideas

Informing ourselves

Most people think that we have a responsibility to remain informed, but keeping up with the news can make us feel increasingly anxious, angry and demoralized.

The constant flood of information has the potential to overwhelm our ability to process it well, but there are ways to become better consumers of news.

Find the right dose

According to psychiatrist M.Katherine Shear, many people feel bogged down by the news. 22% of subjects in a 2015 study experienced symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder after viewing violent images on social media.

We need to view the news, but then also learn to set it aside. Try to find your own dose with emotionally charged news.

Read past the headlines

People regularly share stories based only on headlines. Five or six words are not enough to tell the entire story.

Researchers found that 59 % of shared news links had never been clicked through and read. When you do share a link, try and share a piece of the content from the article, so people understand why you are reacting to it.

Be your own fact-checker

According to a 2016 Pew Research Center survey, 23% of people admit to having shared a fake news story on Facebook, be it on purpose or unknowingly.

When in doubt, cross-check storylines yourself to find a fuller picture of what is fact or opinion.

Diversify your media diet

We tend to read the news that confirms what we already believe, or we read news from a single outlet.

Diversify your news app by including multiple outlets for your news.

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"Getting it right is expensive, getting it first is cheap."

 - Michael Arrington, founder of TechCrunch, on news.

Media Manipulation

It’s when media uses its reach and persuasion power to make people do or think things they otherwise would not. This often comes in the form of exaggeration, distortion, fabrication and simplification.

Roots Of Media Manipulation

Media manipulation exploits the difference between perception and reality using the still remaining trust for truthful content it once had. But the current fast and hyper-competitive nature of the media business driven by clicks and often guided by untrained bloggers or malicious sources contributes to the spread of misinformation even among the mainstream media.