Information In Your Head - Deepstash

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How much can we afford to forget, if we train machines to remember? - Gene Tracy | Aeon Ideas

Information In Your Head

As technology advances and the internet gets dramatically more powerful, the need to retain information in our heads diminishes.

Google and other search engines which deploy AI, work as our 'memory partners' and provide us access to most of the human knowledge.

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How much can we afford to forget, if we train machines to remember? - Gene Tracy | Aeon Ideas

How much can we afford to forget, if we train machines to remember? - Gene Tracy | Aeon Ideas

https://aeon.co/ideas/how-much-can-we-afford-to-forget-if-we-train-machines-to-remember

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Key Ideas

Safe To Forget

As machines become increasingly capable, along with computer memory, power and space being abundantly available, our brains are in a transition phase.

Earlier we had to remember a lot, do calculations on paper, and jog our memories to recall something. More and more of such information isn't processed by our brains anymore and is taken care of by machines.

Peer-To-Peer Memory Networks

Our ancestors had a manual 'peer-to-peer' memory network to pass on knowledge to the future generations; it wasn't reliable but worked for a long time.

Now we believe AI is better and more objective to provide us with information, which might not be the case.

Merging of AI and 'I'

We may be on to a hybrid platform, an extension of our minds, where neural implants and accelerated access to knowledge can blur the lines between what is inside our mind and in an AI machine.

This fusion of Artificial Intelligence enabled devices and our brains might be the future of information and communication.

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