Rules for de-cluttering life - Deepstash

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Declutter Your Life. Declutter Your Mind. - Darius Foroux

Rules for de-cluttering life

  • Don't buy the stuff you can't afford.
  • Live below your means
  • Get rid of things when they take up the space you need. Donate or recycle them.

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The KonMari process

Summed up, it goes like this: you go through every possession you own, hold it in your hands, and keep it only if it evokes some kind of “joy”.

The theory is that any possession that gives you bad or mixed feelings is too costly to have in your life, if it’s possible to get rid of it.

Every possession is a relationship

So it makes sense to carefully consider what we keep in our homes.

Most of us own lots of things that make us feel bad (unused gifts, clothes we don't like or that don't fit, books we’ll never read, etc). And if it’s normal to have hundreds or thousands of possessions, then we are each, at all times, bearing the weight of hundreds or thousands of these relationships. 

Decisions about your identity

Getting rid of stuff can be quite liberating. Much of this process is about deciding who you are and who you’re not going to be. 

You can’t move forward when you’re trying to keep a foot in every door.

Benefits of Decluttering
  • More time and energy for the people and activities you love
  • A more spacious, peaceful, calmer and clutter-free home
  • Financial freedom by choosing to own and buy less
  • Less stress trying to manage and take care of everything you own
  • More time and freedom to pursue your goals and priorities
  • Less time spent cleaning and managing the things you own
  • Easier to keep your home tidy and organized
Quick Tips to Declutter More Effectively

  1. Keep an ongoing donation box easily accessible:.
  2. Instead of keeping things you don’t use or love, get rid of them as soon as you find them.
  3. Try decluttering as quickly and efficiently as you can for just 10 minutes a day.
  4. Schedule regular times to declutter and stick to them.
  5. Use the “one in, one out” rule: Whenever you buy or bring something new into your home, find one thing to get rid of in its place.
  6. Make sure you have a place to keep everything you’re choosing to keep.
  7. Get things out of your house as soon as possible.
  8. Track results. Take before and after pictures.
  9. Don’t organize until after you declutter.
  10. Use a “maybe box” for items you’re struggling to let go of.
  11. Use the 20/20 rule for items you’re keeping “just in case”: It eans if you can replace the item for less than $20 and in less than 20 minutes, don’t keep it “just in case”.

The new minimalism

In part, the new minimalism is a kind of cultural aftershock of the 2008 housing crisis and banking collapse. At the same time, minimalism has become an increasingly aspirational and deluxe way of life.
Minimalism is easily transformed from a philosophy of intentional moderation into an aesthetic language that depicts high-end interior spaces.

Minimalism for the affluent

Many people have minimalism forced upon them by circumstance. Poverty and trauma can make frivolous possessions seem like a lifeline instead of a burden.

Although many of today's gurus insist that minimalism is useful regardless of income, they target the affluent. The focus on self-improvement is more about accumulation.

Minimalism of ideas

True minimalism is not about throwing things out, but about challenging your beliefs in an attempt to engage with ideas as they are, to not shy away from reality or its lack of answers. 

Underneath the vision of “less” is a mode of living that heightens the miracle of human presence.