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How to Help Young People Transition Into Adulthood

The Ordeal

A challenging ordeal, filled with frustration, setbacks, and even failure is an important step in the rite of passage.

Failure is just an opportunity to learn and grow, and this is practically imbibed in the youngsters in the tasks undertaken while ensuring that the focus on the positive aspects.

Some points to ensure:

  • Record and bring forth the lessons from the project activity by making the students aware of the many details they can miss due to their focus on their performance.

  • Keep the 'wonder' part alive and do not let go of ethics and morals in this exercise.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

How to Help Young People Transition Into Adulthood

How to Help Young People Transition Into Adulthood

https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/how_to_help_young_people_transition_into_adulthood

greatergood.berkeley.edu

4

Key Ideas

An Uncertain Future

As the world changes rapidly, the future becomes increasingly uncertain. This impacts the future generation, as a majority of jobs that they would be doing haven't even been invented yet.

We also face environmental, geopolitical and racial/ethnic crisis with an escalating craziness around the world.

As technology advancements penetrate every area of our lives, the skill-sets required are becoming increasingly different. The old demands of compliance and standardized test scores becoming irrelevant.

Youngsters need to build up the definitive skills of the future like critical thinking, resilience, creativity, process-oriented thinking, and empathy.

Rite Of Passage

For youngsters to be comfortable with challenges, failure, and uncertainty, a three-step approach is put forth, which has the elements of separation, liminality, and reincorporation

This approach, comprising of three stages (preparation, threshold and reflection), enables one to rise, and transcend to a different level, having learned new skills.

The Ordeal

A challenging ordeal, filled with frustration, setbacks, and even failure is an important step in the rite of passage.

Failure is just an opportunity to learn and grow, and this is practically imbibed in the youngsters in the tasks undertaken while ensuring that the focus on the positive aspects.

Some points to ensure:

  • Record and bring forth the lessons from the project activity by making the students aware of the many details they can miss due to their focus on their performance.

  • Keep the 'wonder' part alive and do not let go of ethics and morals in this exercise.

The Reflection of the Ordeal

Once the students have completed their ordeal, there is a sense of accomplishment and learning of new experiences along with the formation of new bonds. It is a good idea to celebrate these accomplishments and reflect upon the learnings of the project, along with the memories and key take-aways.
The youngsters feel a major sense of identity, a change of state that comes with accomplishing a major stretch goal. This Rite of Passage exercise prepares youngsters into adulthood, as it affects their entire being: mind, body and soul.

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