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Feeling blue? Here's a simple first step.

Life On The Edge

Life around us is changing rapidly. We have the power to share anything to millions of people, in this age of technological evolution that we don’t fully comprehend. It is important to speak your mind, be authentic and not overexpose yourself.

As our lives go more and more virtual, we are not talking much to others, as we used to, unable to ask for support or help, or even someone to listen to us. An effective antidote to taming this mental isolation and suffocation is to start writing.

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Feeling blue? Here's a simple first step.

Feeling blue? Here's a simple first step.

https://writingcooperative.com/feeling-blue-heres-a-simple-first-step-b7868c1ec0fc

writingcooperative.com

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Key Ideas

Life On The Edge

Life around us is changing rapidly. We have the power to share anything to millions of people, in this age of technological evolution that we don’t fully comprehend. It is important to speak your mind, be authentic and not overexpose yourself.

As our lives go more and more virtual, we are not talking much to others, as we used to, unable to ask for support or help, or even someone to listen to us. An effective antidote to taming this mental isolation and suffocation is to start writing.

Write Your Blues

  • Writing is a process of unfurling your thoughts and is a healthy alternative to sitting down with a friend and having a heart-to-heart talk. Just writing down what’s on your head and having it in front of you provides you with a space to interact with your thoughts productively.
  • When we start talking to our mind by writing, we see that we are having a healthy conversation with ourselves, which is cathartic and helps our mind express things that were repressed earlier.

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