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Why food memories are so powerful

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Food memories are formed unconsciously and can create certain curious associations and preferences in our life. It adds nostalgia and emotional meaning to our recollection of the experience.


The smells and tastes of the past infuse wonder, colour and depth to our life.

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Why food memories are so powerful

Why food memories are so powerful

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20190826-why-food-memories-are-so-powerful

bbc.com

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Key Ideas

Food Memory

Eating specific foods which were consumed in our early years can evoke powerful and emotional memories, lying dormant in our subconscious for decades. This is possible even if the food was first relished at an early age, which we cannot recall any memory of.


Example: Eating a certain flavour of strawberries as a child can trigger the memory or recognition of the particular taste when eaten after decades as an adult.

Chocolate Cupcakes

Food memories are formed unconsciously and can create certain curious associations and preferences in our life. It adds nostalgia and emotional meaning to our recollection of the experience.


The smells and tastes of the past infuse wonder, colour and depth to our life.

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