deepstash

Beta

What to Know About Using Cannabis Right Now

Your options

Edibles, like gummies, candies, mints, cookies, and even some drinks are excellent choices that won't affect the lugs.

With ingestion methods, start low and see how it affects you. Wait two hours before taking more. Go slow if you are new to it.

43 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

What to Know About Using Cannabis Right Now

What to Know About Using Cannabis Right Now

https://elemental.medium.com/what-to-know-about-using-cannabis-right-now-27a9c53b8fe2

elemental.medium.com

4

Key Ideas

Smoking cannabis

Experts warn that smoking or vaping cannabis or anything else is not good for the lungs, regardless if it's during a pandemic or not.

Smoking specifically damages type 2 pneumocyte cells in the lungs. The new virus also binds to the type 2 pneumocytes. If you have less type 2 pneumocytes, your lungs are already under stress. If you smoke and contract the virus, you're going to be worse off.

Effects on the immune system

There are over 100 cannabinoids in the cannabis plant. Most interact with the immune system, but research on the effects of cannabinoids on the immune system is contradictory.

While some of these compounds do appear to have anti-inflammatory properties in preclinical studies, it has not been proven to be effective against the new virus or other viral infections.

Your options

Edibles, like gummies, candies, mints, cookies, and even some drinks are excellent choices that won't affect the lugs.

With ingestion methods, start low and see how it affects you. Wait two hours before taking more. Go slow if you are new to it.

The caveats

For medical patients, different methods of consumption can cause different therapeutic effects. Not everyone can process cannabinoids that are consumed orally, especially people with digestive disorders.

If you must inhale, the safest method is using a dry herb vaporizer that uses cannabis buds or flowers.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

A common effort

As the global spread of the virus accelerates, this sort of do-it-yourself response to the shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) is becoming very common, with medical researchers, busines...

Safety of homemade devices

So far, the evidence is insufficient and mixed; there are a few ideas that show promise,  but there is also some concern that improvised measures could make things worse.
The last thing you want is for healthcare workers to have a false sense of protection and perform a risky procedure on a patient.

Making masks

The medical opinion on homemade masks is mixed. None of the everyday materials you could use to make masks work as well as a commercial surgical mask, but the homemade versions do prevent some microbes from getting through, suggesting these substitute masks are better than nothing at all: they could theoretically slow the spread of disease by helping keep the virus from escaping people’s noses and mouths.

2 more ideas

What we know

The virus that is causing the current outbreak is a respiratory one and spreads through droplet infection.

  • There have been no known cases of the virus spreading through "smear" inf...
Contaminated surfaces
  • The virus can be detected in aerosols (airborne droplets smaller than five micrometers) for up to three hours.
  • On copper, for up to four hours.
  • On cardboard, for up to 24 hours.
  • On stainless steel or plastic, for up to three days.

The virus particles on any surface decrease rapidly at the start, then slowly approaches zero over time.

Touching or eating contaminated food

If a food worker coughs over your food while preparing it, although really gross, your risk of contracting the disease that way is minimal.

According to a 2018 overview of respiratory viruses, the virus reproduces along the respiratory tract. It is a different pathway than the digestive tract food follows when you swallow it.

Even if you handle contaminated food and then deposit the virus along your respiratory tract, it's highly unlikely to get sick this way.

6 more ideas

The influenza pandemic of 1918

It is often referred to incorrectly as the “Spanish flu.” Between 50 and 100 million people are thought to have died, representing as much as 5% of the world’s population. Half a billion people...

The origins of the "Spanish" flu

The so-called Spanish flu did not originate in Spain. The geographic origin of the flu is debated to this day, though hypotheses have suggested East Asia, Europe, and even Kansas.
The influenza pandemic from 1918 got this name most likely because of the WWI context: The major countries involved in the war were keen to avoid encouraging their enemies, so reports of the extent of the flu were suppressed in Germany, Austria, France, the United Kingdom and the U.S. By contrast, neutral Spain had no need to keep the flu under wraps. That created the false impression that Spain was bearing the brunt of the disease.

The end of mankind

The 1918 flu spread rapidly, killing 25 million people in just the first six months. This led some to fear the end of mankind and that the whole thing was caused by a form of super-virus.
Recent studies show that the high death rate can be attributed to crowding in military camps and urban environments, as well as poor nutrition and sanitation, which suffered during wartime.

8 more ideas