The great ball court from Chichen Itza - Deepstash

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Centers of Progress: Chichen Itza (Team Sports)

The great ball court from Chichen Itza

The great ball court from Chichen Itza
  • The court of Chichen Itza is a massive 225 feet wide and 545 feet long.
  • At the ends of the court, the stone walls featured stone hoops, engraved with feathered serpents - images of the deity Kokulkan.
  • The court has excellent acoustic qualities, amplifying the cheers of fans and the calls of the ballplayers.
  • The sides of the court are lined with benches for spectators. The benches are sloped to help keep the ball in the courts.
  • At the end of many games, the losing team was beheaded and sacrificed to the Mayans' deities. That said, the Ball Game occasionally served as a substitute for war.
  • A variation of the Ball Game, Ulama is still played today— minus the ritual killing of the losing team.

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