Our addiction to bad news - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

Why every year-but especially 2020-feels like the worst ever

Our addiction to bad news

Our addiction to bad news

If every year feels like the worst, it's mostly because our brains tend to judge the present more harshly. Indiscriminately watching the news skews our perception and makes us more prone to slip into unhealthy patterns.

Many of us become obsessed with the world's seemingly increasing danger. We can't stop checking narratives of the deadly diseases, police brutality, protests, conspiracy theories, and politics, even if it is halfway around the world.

81 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Why every year-but especially 2020-feels like the worst ever

Why every year-but especially 2020-feels like the worst ever

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2020/09/why-2020-feels-like-the-worst-year-ever/

nationalgeographic.com

4

Key Ideas

Our addiction to bad news

If every year feels like the worst, it's mostly because our brains tend to judge the present more harshly. Indiscriminately watching the news skews our perception and makes us more prone to slip into unhealthy patterns.

Many of us become obsessed with the world's seemingly increasing danger. We can't stop checking narratives of the deadly diseases, police brutality, protests, conspiracy theories, and politics, even if it is halfway around the world.

Our negative interpretation of current events

In Western culture, people tend to interpret current events negatively, while we tend to remember the positive experiences of the past.

Frightening things have happened in the past too and before the current pandemic, the majority of Americans already believed the country was going downhill.

Doomscrolling and social media

  • According to a 2017 survey, respondents who consumed excessive news reported lost sleep, stress, anxiety, and fatigue.
  • In 1968, a study found a direct correlation between time spent watching television and the likelihood that the watcher will perceive the world more dangerous. Viewers who watch violent television shows generally believe violence is common in reality.

However, the effects of media aren't always negative. It depends on the medium of consumption and how you use it. Actively engaging in positive conversations with friends and family can have a positive effect. Lurking or scrolling through updates without engaging has a negative psychological impact.

Controlling our biases towards the present

While we may never see the present as perfect, we can learn to control our biases.

  • Acknowledge how the media shifts our perceptions. It can make the present look worse than in the past.
  • Take a realistic view of history and compare it with the present.
  • Take stock in what we do have. We are making progress socially and scientifically, a feat that would have been impossible a hundred years ago.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Denying Your Own Creativity

That’s a self-imposed and self-limiting belief. Stop that.

Creativity is a requirement for problem-solving and we all problem-solve. Acknowledge that you're inherently creative,

Being Afraid Of Being Wrong

We hate being wrong, but mistakes often teach us the most and allow us to innovate.

Think of the pros and cons of trying something and then free yourself to do it. If it doesn't work, take what you learn, and try something else. 

Being Too "Serious"

The persona of the fool allows the truth to be told, without the usual ramifications that might come with speaking against social conventions. Give yourself permission to be a fool and see things for what they really are.

7 more ideas

The effects of the unlucky charm
The effects of the unlucky charm

Research shows that lucky charms have real, positive effects. But unlucky things have their own kind of power.

The story behind a physical item we own matters

Assigning luck to an object

There are generally three ways we give luck to an object.

  • Through association: A penny you had the day you met your partner.
  • Through symbolism: Like a sock with four-leaf clovers or black cats printed on them.
  • Magical contagion: The idea that there is some essence or physical property that can rub off from contacting it.
Bad associations

According to research, secondhand engagement rings are much less likely to sell if the listing indicated that the previous owner had been through a divorce or a broken engagement. One explanation is that we believe that various properties can be transmitted through contact.

Sometimes, you create the story yourself. The item has to be prominent in the situation. But if the item is branded as unlucky, it's hard to forget the association.

Precrastination
Precrastination

Precrastination is described as rushing to complete a subgoal so you can tick it off your to-do list at the expense of extra effort. As a result, you will need more effort later to complete...

How to avoid ‘precrastination’
  • Ask yourself if a task can benefit from added time. Those that require creativity, thoughtfulness, or emotion will need a slower response.
  • Identify the tasks you can rush through.
  • Keep a calendar and to-do list. Externalizing what's cluttering your mind will leave you with energy to channel elsewhere.
The claims of the binaural beats industry
The claims of the binaural beats industry

Many companies are making daring affirmations that binaural beats work like “digital drugs” to “biohack” your brain, that have the power to unlock your memory and creativity while keeping a...

Binaural beats might affect our brains in some way

They may boost our attention span, calm our anxiety and promote pain relief, although evidence is still insufficient. Studies showed that the effects increased the longer people listened.

But whatever mechanism is creating these changes remains unknown.

How binaural beats work

You can hear these beats best with a pair of good headphones. When each ear picks up a slightly different pitch, the brain tries to compensate and finds a frequency somewhere in the middle. This supposedly causes both hemispheres of the brain to harmonize their brainwaves, a phenomenon called neural entrainment.

Brainwaves are the regular patterns that firing neurons create in our brains, so binaural beats could be bringing these rhythmic patterns into alignment (some research still debates this).

one more idea

Podcasting: The origins
Podcasting: The origins

The origin of the word ‘podcast’ was in a 2004 column in The Guardian by Ben Hammersley.

He made up a sentence mentioning podcasting while delving into a possible name fo...

Audio Blogs

Essentially audio blogs, taking advantage of the freedom of speech, early podcasts were chatty, amateur products, until some heavyweights joined the bandwagon, like MTV VJs, journalists and talk-radio personalities.

This was fueled by the fact that the old public radio medium had certain creative limitations along with rules and regulations that were not a problem in the world of podcasting.

Experiments in broadcasting
  • Podcasting started evolving with certain progressive companies like Stitcher along with early sponsors playing to a crude, uneven audience.
  • Podcasting kept growing slowly, even during the 2008/09 recession, which was ironically a creative peak for the medium.
  • Many new shows launched and things eventually reached a plateau in 2010/11.

one more idea