deepstash

Beta

What is Self-Improvement?

Lasting Self-Improvement

Self-improvement is identifying current strategies, how they meet your current needs and solve your current problems, and figuring out how to adjust them into a better configuration. It must start by recognizing who you are now, then making small and stable changes to reach the stage where the problem has been solved.

730 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

What is Self-Improvement?

What is Self-Improvement?

https://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/2018/12/25/what-is-self-improvement/

scotthyoung.com

4

Key Ideas

External Improvement vs. Self-Improvement

  • External improvement: Money, fitness, credentials, status, friends, etc. 
  • Self-improvement: Habits, thought patterns, confidence, beliefs, learned skills and behaviors.
You can improve your external situation without improving yourself, but that tends to result from luck and circumstances you can’t control.  

External improvement...

... that doesn't arise from self-improvement is from circumstances or factors outside your control. Winning the lottery may be great, but if you’re broke right now, that’s not a strategy to bank on. Instead you need to start by changing your own behaviors, skills and habits.

Life Strategy

Your total life strategy is a collection of every habit, behavior and thought pattern, conscious and unconscious, that you use to solve the problems you have in life, meet your needs and stay alive. 

Lasting Self-Improvement

Self-improvement is identifying current strategies, how they meet your current needs and solve your current problems, and figuring out how to adjust them into a better configuration. It must start by recognizing who you are now, then making small and stable changes to reach the stage where the problem has been solved.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Self-control
Self-control

It’s your ability to resolve conflicts between your short-term desires and your long-term goals.

For example, successful self-control means sacrificing immediate pleasure (cookies a...

Why self-control matters

People who have high self-control aren’t missing out on enjoyment. Not being able to resist temptation and enjoying life are not the same things.

They tend to eat in a healthily way, exercise more, sleep better, drink less alcohol, smoke fewer cigarettes, achieve higher grades at university, have more peaceful relationships, and are more financially secure.

Biological limits to self-control

Research showed that self-control is ultimately limited by our biology. We can’t exercise effortful self-control indefinitely – the brain has to do regular maintenance to remain functional.

6 more ideas

The Repeated Bout Effect
The more you repeat a behavior, the less it impacts you because you become accustomed to it.
Examples Of The Repeated Bout Effect
  • When you haven't done much strength training, doing 30 pushups will make you stronger. But after a few months, an extra of 30 pushups isn't really building new muscle.
  • When you drink coffee for the first time, you notice an immediate caffeine spike. But after years of consumption, one cup of coffee seems to make less of a difference.
3 Lessons On Improvement
  • Doing a light amount of work is a great way to reduce the pain of difficult sessions.
  • The amount of work that you need to do to reach your maximum level of output is higher than what you are doing now.
  • Deliberate practice is critical to long-term success. Doing the same type of work over and over again is a strange form of laziness.

2 more ideas

Disease of More

Used in sports to explain why teams who win championships are often ultimately dethroned, not by other, better teams, but by forces from within the organization itself. The players want more: more ...

Our imagined "better"

Regardless of our external circumstances, we live in a constant state of mild-but-not-fully-satisfying happiness. Things are pretty much always fine. But they could also always be better. And that's why most of us live most of our lives constantly chasing our imagined "better".

The hedonic treadmill

It's the constant chasing of pleasure. 

People who are constantly striving for a “better life” end up expending a ton of effort only to end up in the same place.

one more idea