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5-Hour Rule: If you're not spending 5 hours per week learning, you're being irresponsible

Learning is an investment

Benjamin Franklin said, “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.”  It's the reason Warren Buffett (& other successful individuals) spends 80% of his time reading. 

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5-Hour Rule: If you're not spending 5 hours per week learning, you're being irresponsible

5-Hour Rule: If you're not spending 5 hours per week learning, you're being irresponsible

https://medium.com/accelerated-intelligence/the-5-hour-rule-if-youre-not-spending-5-hours-per-week-learning-you-re-being-irresponsible-791c3f18f5e6

medium.com

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Key Ideas

Charlie Munger

Charlie Munger

“In my whole life, I have known no wise people (over a broad subject matter area) who didn’t read all the time — none. Zero.”

Learning is an investment

Benjamin Franklin said, “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.”  It's the reason Warren Buffett (& other successful individuals) spends 80% of his time reading. 

Intellectual Capital

Knowledge is the new money. While goods and services are becoming demonetized and replaced by machines, knowledge is becoming increasingly valuable.

Demonetization (or Dematerialization)

The term coined by futurist Peter Diamandis is a process by which technology is rendering previously expensive products or services much cheaper — or even free. 

It's mainly happening because we are moving hardware products to software. For example, the phone today has about $1M of applications from a decade ago.

Automatization Problem

People at the bottom of the economic ladder are being squeezed more aby automation, while those at the top have more opportunities and are paid more than ever before. 

The irony is that the problem isn’t a lack of jobs. Rather, it’s a lack of people with the right skills and knowledge to fill the jobs.

Knowledge has Compound Value

But, unlike money, when you use knowledge or give it away, you don’t lose it. In fact, it’s the opposite. The more you give away knowledge, the more you remember it, connect it with other ideas, etc. 

Mastering the knowledge economy

  1. Identify valuable knowledge at the right time. Things move fast. 
  2. Learn and master that knowledge quickly. Take advantage of existing opportunities. 
  3. Communicate the value of your skills to others. 
  4. Convert knowledge into money and results. Get a better job, demand better fees, etc. 
  5. Learn how to financially invest in learning to get the highest return. Find the right “portfolio” of books, online courses etc. 
  6. Master the skill of learning how to learn. 

Mahatma Gandhi

Mahatma Gandhi

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” 

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The 5-Hour Rule
The 5-Hour Rule

The most successful, busy people in the world dedicate at least 5 hours a week to deliberate learning.

The 5-Hour Rule is the most critical practice we can all adopt for long-term career suc...

The Simple Math 

It takes about 6,400 hours of class time and studying to get a 4-year degree. Assume that it takes you only 5,000 hours to master your field.

While you are happy that you've prepared for your profession, the knowledge you've learned is fast becoming outdated. We can safely assume that in 10 years, 50% of the facts in the field would be outdated. This means that for you, just to keep up in your current field, you'd need to learn 5 hours per week, 50 weeks a year.

Trends To Consider

When we consider the future of work, there are two trends we should keep a note of. They are:

  1. Half-life of knowledge
  2. Law of increasing learning

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Flow is the state of mind

... where we are so immersed in a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity that we lose sense of space and time.

It is thought to be t...

Why it’s hard to achieve flow in your workplace
  • The processes, policies, and busy work gets in the way.
  • Most jobs don’t have a clear goal.
  • Feedback can be inadequate.
  • The pace of work has increased, and it’s hard for people to spend time thinking deeply.
  • Your skills aren’t well matched to the challenges you are allowed to pursue.
  • There’s a lack of control over interruptions or when and how you work.
  • The job doesn’t push you out of your comfort zone.
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... to push your mind beyond its comfort zone. Flow happens when we get a bit out of our comfort zone. Too much, and you get anxious; Too little and you get bored.

You need to know your physical or emotional limitations and consciously push past them.

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The modern polymath

... is someone who becomes competent in at least 3 diverse domains and integrates them into a top 1-percent skill set.

In another words, they bring the best of what humanity has discov...

Leonardo Da Vinci
Leonardo Da Vinci

"Study the science of art. Study the art of science. Develop your senses — especially learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else."

Famous polymaths

Polymaths have existed forever (they are often the ones who’ve advanced Western civilization more than any others )  but they’ve been called different things throughout history:

Philosopher king: Aristotle, Marcus Aurelius, Archimedes.

Renaissance person: Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo, Galileo Galilei.

Gentleman scholar: Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams.

Polymath: Marie Curie, Isaac Newton, Theodore Roosevelt.

Modern polymath: Elon Musk, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg.

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