Ancient Egypt and hieroglyphs - Deepstash

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How we deciphered Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs

Ancient Egypt and hieroglyphs

Ancient Egypt and hieroglyphs

Ancient Egypt has exerted power of influence on the world of learning for over two millennia.

The Greek historian Herodotus identified the pyramids at Giza as places of royal burial, but his works did not help 19th Century scholars in understanding ancient Egyptian writing. Greek and Roman writers could not read hieroglyphs either.

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