Individuals that pursue status - Deepstash

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Cracking the Popularity Code

Individuals that pursue status

Throughout adulthood, we can pursue greater likability or greater status. This decision is complicated by the growing number of platforms (TV, social media) designed to help us gain status.

Research finds that unlike the positive outcomes associated with high likability, those who care more about their status grow up to have difficulties with their interpersonal relationships later on.

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