Focus on becoming likeable - Deepstash

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Cracking the Popularity Code

Focus on becoming likeable

Studies reveal that likeable people are granted privileges that become self-perpetuating. Those who are liked are invited to join others more often, and in turn, offered extra opportunities to learn skills. These skills lead to even greater likability and more learning occasions.

Once people realize that status is linked with negative outcomes, it will be easier to return to a focus on likability.

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