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Giving Feedback: Boosting Your People's Confidence and Ability

Keep in mind

  • Prepare your comments: Will help you stay in track;
  • Be specific: Tell the person exactly what he needs to improve;
  • Criticize in private: While public recognition is appreciated, public scrutiny is not;
  • Use "I" Statements: Give feedback from your perspective;
  • Limit your focus: no more than 2 issues/session;
  • Talk about positives too. But don't overdo it, because it takes away the message;
  • Provide specific suggestions: what needs to be done to improve the situation;
  • Follow-up.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Giving Feedback: Boosting Your People's Confidence and Ability

Giving Feedback: Boosting Your People's Confidence and Ability

https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newTMM_98.htm

mindtools.com

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Key Ideas

The "why" of feedback

The purpose of giving feedback is to improve the situation or the person's performance. You won't accomplish that by being harsh, critical or offensive.

You'll likely get much more from people when your approach is positive and focused on improvement. That's not to say feedback always has to be good, but it should be fair and balanced. 

Timing of the feedback

The closer to the event you address the issue, the better. 

And it's much easier to provide feedback about a single, one-hour job that hasn't been done properly than it is to do so about a whole year of failed, one-hour jobs.

But if the situation involved is highly emotional, wait until everyone has calmed down before you engage in feedback

Make it regular

Informal, simple feedback should be given much more often than this – perhaps every week or even every day, depending on the situation.

It's not a once-a-year or a once-every-three-month event. Though this may be the timing of formal feedback.

Keep in mind

  • Prepare your comments: Will help you stay in track;
  • Be specific: Tell the person exactly what he needs to improve;
  • Criticize in private: While public recognition is appreciated, public scrutiny is not;
  • Use "I" Statements: Give feedback from your perspective;
  • Limit your focus: no more than 2 issues/session;
  • Talk about positives too. But don't overdo it, because it takes away the message;
  • Provide specific suggestions: what needs to be done to improve the situation;
  • Follow-up.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Feedback
Feedback

Feedback provides an opportunity to gain insights about a person's personal and professional actions.
Without feedback, we will move in the same direction without realizing our shortcomings. ...

Types of feedback
  • Positive vs. negative. Positive feedback confirms that someone is taking good action, while negative feedback shows what actions need to be corrected.
  • Formal vs. informal. Formal feedback is given on a set schedule, and informal feedback is short and follows after an action or event.
  • Annual vs. monthly
  • Verbal vs. written
  • Manager vs. peer
Effective feedback
Effective feedback is:
  • Objective. Don't let your personal feelings get in the way.
  • Timely. Feedback should follow when the event is still fresh.
  • Constructive. Give respect and show that you have their best interests in mind.
  • Actionable. Feedback must include immediate next steps.
  • Warranted. Give your employees room for mistakes and learn from them.

6 more ideas

Negative Feedback
Negative feedback is a more important component of the feedback cycle than positive feedback. 92% of people say in a study that negative feedback improves workplace performance.
Why are people scared of Feedback

Normally people react with caution and fear towards negative feedback, but it is much better than no feedback at all.

Informing the colleague/subordinate/client/customer or individual about something that is not working, is always beneficial, and builds transparency and trust.

Check how it impacts the person

The fundamental goal of giving feedback is to help the person you’re giving it to. They should realize that you are not trying to make them feel bad, and this is an exercise to help make them better.

How it impacts each individual is going to be different so a tailor-made approach is required. 

5 more ideas

1:1 meetings
1:1 meetings

1:1 meetings matter. It is important to nurture that essential employee-manager relationship. But it still not easy to get right.

Under pressures, managers are still juggl...

1:1 category

The goal of an effective 1:1 is not an update from your direct report or for you to lay down some instructions. It's a conversation. It's a chance to hear about your direct reports' ideas for your product, their career goals, and possibly their opinion of their performance.

Keep a list of three potential topics ready for discussion. When they say they have nothing to discuss, you can jumpstart the conversation with one of your items.

Manager's best tool

Your most precious resource is your own time and energy. When you spend it on your team, it helps build healthy relationships.

Your job as a manager isn't to give advice or 'save the day.'' It's to empower your reports to find the answer themselves. If you want to understand what's going on, ask. Let her lead the conversation while you listen and probe.

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Negative vs. Positive Feedback
Positive feedback isn’t the best way to drive results and negative feedback isn’t actually all that bad:
  • Any negative feedback should be clear and timely yet not so harsh as to be pe...
For feedback to be effective...
  • Be Specific;
  • Be Immediate: you wait too long, it can have less impact and make it harder for the person to grasp exactly what needs changing;
  • Tie Feedback to Goals: it gives the receiver a clear goal to work towards and reason why you’ve given them this feedback;
  • Ensure Feedback Is Actionable;
  • Use the Right Language;
  • Don't avoid it: when feedback is given openly and honestly, it can be extremely valuable for your organization.
Plussing
Is a way to provide feedback and critique without creating fear or negative feelings, branded by the animation studio Pixar. 

Imagine an art director giving feedback to an animator on some sketches for Pixar’s next blockbuster movie and instead of saying something like “but the characters expression is all wrong,” they’ll frame it using more encouraging and creative words like and or what if: “what if we could make their expression more (enthusiastic, brazen, etc).

Use The "Sandwich" Approach And Be Specific On The Expected Results

"Sandwiching" your critique between two positive things about the person's softens the blow, and avoids it coming off like an attack. The mix of positive and negative makes people more likel...

Give Feedback, Not Instruction

Keep your criticism to your observations, and the impact they have. Don't try to fix the problem, just identify it.

Offer to help fix the problem, and to support the solution that the other person comes up with. Unless you know how to do the work your coworker is doing, don't try to solve it for them—they'll ignore your feedback and you.

Give Kind Criticism, And Remember The Point Of It

The point of your criticism is to help someone improve, or to correct a problem, and your feedbacks should carry that message. If you’re doing anything but that, reevaluate whether you actually have legitimate criticism to give, or you just need to talk to someone.

Offer positive and specific suggestions to alleviate the issue at hand, or identify the problem clearly without talking about the person, just the issue.

one more idea

“People seldom refuse help, if one offers it in the right way.”

A. C. Benson.

On Giving Constructive Criticism

Sharing and receiving feedback is necessary for improvement. If you have ideas on how someone can improve, don’t hold your ideas back, share your criticism constructively.

Of course, be sensitive to others’ feelings and offer feedback when you feel the other person is ready to take it. Else, you may come across as imposing your views on others, especially if you repeatedly tell them what to do without them requesting it.

1. Use The Feedback Sandwich

Also known as PIP (Positive-Improvement-Positive), it consists of “sandwiching” a critic between two positive comments in the following manner:

  1. Start by focusing on the strengths — what you like about the item in question.
  2. Then, provide the criticism — things you don’t like and areas of improvement.
  3. Lastly, round off the feedback with (a) a reiteration of the positive comments you began with and (b) the positive results that can be expected if the criticism is acted upon.

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Why Feedback Goes Wrong
  • Strong emotions on both sides;
  • A focus on character rather than on behavior;
  • A lack of clarity about what needs to change and why;
  • Negative or critical feedback threate...
Right vs. Wrong reasons to give feedback

Wrong reasons:

  • defend/excuse your own behavior;
  • to demoralize/condemn;
  • you're in a bad mood;
  • to appease a third party;

to make yourself seem superior/powerful

Right reasons:

  • commitment/concern for another;
  • sense of responsibility;
  • to guide/mentor;
  • to support/enhance.
Effective Feedback is...
  • Specific, Timely, Meaningful, and Candid;
  • Goal-oriented;
  • Focused on the future;
  • Focused on the process, not the person;
  • Isn't afraid to be negative;
  • Can be positive;
  • Doesn't assume it's right.

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Negativity bias and feedback
Receiving criticism will always have a greater impact than receiving praise.

And we remember criticism strongly but inaccurately. But although criticism is more lik...

Criteria for effective feedback
  • The feedback provider is credible in the eyes of the feedback recipient;
  • The feedback provider is trusted by the feedback recipient;
  • The feedback is conveyed with good intentions;
  • The timing and circumstances of giving the feedback are appropriate;
  • The feedback is given in an interactive manner;
  • The feedback message is clear;
  • The feedback is helpful to recipient.
15. Show Respect And Stay Objective
  • Choose words that do not put the receiver on the defensive.
  • Use "I" messages, like “I’ve noticed”, rather than "you" messages, like “you always.”
  • Keep your emotions out of it,...
14. Use Criticism Well

If you use criticism to bash or undermine, it will be harmful. If you dismiss criticism without reflection it will be useless. But if you assess criticism objectively and without emotion, you can discover what's useful to you, and shrug the rest off. 

13. Discuss Behavior, Impact And Action

Focus on the impact of specific behavior and give expected corrections, but refrain from focusing on personality or intent. This causes less hurt feelings.

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Tips for giving negative feedback
  • Be direct by avoiding the feedback"sanwich"(which can dilute the message and sounds insincere);
  • Don't let criticism accumulate: schedule weekly check-ins with your t...