Levels of Bloom's Taxonomy - Deepstash

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Using Bloom's Taxonomy for Effective Learning

Levels of Bloom's Taxonomy

Knowledge - Remembering previously learned information

Comprehension - Demonstrating an understanding of the facts

Application - Applying knowledge to actual situations

Analysis - Breaking down objects or ideas into simpler parts and finding evidence to support realization

Synthesis - Compiling component ideas into a new whole or propose alternative solutions

Evaluation - Making and defending judgments based on internal evidence or external criteria

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Using Bloom's Taxonomy for Effective Learning

Using Bloom's Taxonomy for Effective Learning

https://www.thoughtco.com/blooms-taxonomy-the-incredible-teaching-tool-2081869

thoughtco.com

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Key Ideas

Bloom's Taxonomy for Effective Learning

A method used by teachers to improve learning: Students are asked to deal with increasingly challenging questions to test their comprehension of a given material. By asking critical thinking questions, all levels of thinking are being developed. 


Students will have improved attention to detail, as well as an increase in their comprehension and problem-solving skills.

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Bloom's Taxonomy Explained with a Pen
Bloom's Taxonomy Explained with a Pen

Knowledge - What is a pen? What does it look like?

Comprehension - What are some uses for a pen? Is it only used to write?

Application - How do you use it?

"It is not enough to just formulate questions but we should also use other simple examples as the pen to explain the levels of Bloom's Taxonomy, so that we would be able to understand how to cr...

"It is not enough to just formulate questions but we should also use other simple examples as the pen to explain the levels of Bloom's Taxonomy, so that we would be able to understand how to create these questions ourselves."

Content vs. Process
Content vs. Process

A lot of people feel that learning "content" in schools is not as valuable as it once was, they often refer to the "doctor analogy" 

"I want to know that my doctor did really well in ...

Tacit Knowledge ≠ Explicit Knowledge

Tacit Knowledge is defined as the "know how" (process)  rather than "know what" (content). A part of it could be codified into explicit knowledge. However, it is often difficult to explain just by writing it down. It is something you learn by doing.

Explicit Knowledge, on the other hand, refers to information we see on the books or the internet.

Although there's a difference, one is not dependable without the other

Dr. John Medina
Dr. John Medina

“Any education environment that only emphasizes one form of knowledge or the other [tacit or explicit] is failing the human brain."

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Bloom's Taxonomy's Synthesis
Bloom's Taxonomy's Synthesis

Synthesis is placed on fifth level of the Bloom's Taxonomy. This is the level where parts or information are put as a whole in order to create new meaning or a new structure.

...
Synthesis Writing

It is a process in which a student makes the explicit connection between an argument and an evidence from sources with similar or dissimilar ideas. Sources could be from articles, fiction, posts, or infographics as well as non-written sources, such as films, lectures, audio recordings, or observations.

Two Types of Synthesis Essays
Explanatory Synthesis
  • Used to deconstruct or divide evidence into logical parts.
  • Usually describes objects, places, events, or processes.
  • It is objective, it doesn't present a position.
Argumentative Synthesis
  • Presents a position or opinion which is supported with evidence

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