Turning changes into habits - Deepstash
Turning changes into habits

Turning changes into habits

  • Make the change tiny, end let it embed. Babauta suggests making one change every four to six weeks.
  • He also advises addressing one thing at a time, rather than trying to solve problems simultaneously.

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MORE IDEAS FROM The Zen rule for becoming happier: Change one thing

Any change should be small

Leo Babauta, founder of Zen Habits, says that any change should be small; not a goal, but a tiny first step. 

It could be running for 10 minutes, drawing for 2 minutes etc.

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Slow down and take things one tiny step at a time

Any decision to change one’s life, in such a complex context, needs to be extremely simple and easy to follow.

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The algorithm to make any change
  1. Start very small.
  2. Do only one change at a time
  3. Be present and enjoy the activity (don't focus on results).
  4. Be grateful for every step you take.

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RELATED IDEA

Taking small steps

In order to make any change in one’s life—whether it’s to get out of debt, become fit enough to run a marathon, or get on better with your family, start with a single change. It should be small; not a goal, but a tiny first step. It could be to run for ten minutes; to spend two minutes drawing; to prepare a healthy work lunch for one day a week. It could be to stay in hard conversations for a moment after you want to leave and spend that moment trying to listen.

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Toxic News Bombarded At You 24/7

Most of the sensational news stories we read and watch on TV all day are just to grab our eyeballs and do not even matter any more after a short while.

The more information we have around us, the less we digest, and it makes sense to go over quality (depth of news) than quantity (breadth of news stories).

The way to save yourself from the deluge of news vying for your attention is to have an innovative and counterintuitive approach to information: making a ‘smart information filter’ net.

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The beautiful mess effect

We don't expect other people to be perfect but appreciate when people show their vulnerabilities and admit errors. Yet, we're afraid to expose our own shortcomings.

This is known as "the beautiful mess effect." We see other people's honesty about their flaws as positive, and our own as problematic. Other people's flaws function more like an instructive tale as the distance gives us perspective.

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