Habitually Complex - Deepstash

Habitually Complex

Too much complexity in our daily decisions and routines could lead to avoidance of work, and though complexity keeps life interesting, we need to embrace it only when we enjoy the process.

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MORE IDEAS FROM Complexity Bias: Why We Overcomplicate Our Lives

  1. Move towards action by doing more and researching less. Follow the ‘Just Do It’ mantra.
  2. Choose one system that works with your natural inclination, even if it isn’t the best way.
  3. Occam's Razor states that the explanation which is the simplest and has the least number of assumptions is more likely to be true. Embrace this mental model in your daily decisions.

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The Complexity Bias

Many of us prefer complicated solutions and explanations over simpler ones. This cognitive error is known as the Complexity Bias.

We don’t listen to simple, basic advice to be productive and healthy, like doing regular exercise or rising early every morning. Our mind gets attracted to complex procedures and ideas like intermittent fasting, keto diet, and other finicky solutions that dazzle us with their twisted ways.

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RELATED IDEA

We All Tend To Make The Same Mental Mistakes

Economists used to believe that people will always choose the option that maximizes their well-being. But people act against their rational self-interest all the time.

We procrastinate and eat junk food and say yes to the things we don't have time for. Two Israeli psychologists found that we predictably make the same mental mistakes that can be avoided if we are aware of them.

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  1. System 1 and System 2: Use fast thinking for routine decisions and slow thinking for important decisions.
  2. Bayesian Thinking: Continuously update the confidence in your beliefs as you come across new information.
  3. First Principles Thinking: If you face a difficult problem, break it down and reassemble it from the ground up.
  4. Occam’s Razor: When there are many possible explanations, assume that the simplest one is probably correct.
  5. Hanlon’s Razor: If someone mistreats you, assume that they probably did it out of neglect rather than malice.

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The egocentric bias

The egocentric bias causes us to think that our own perspectives are more important when considering events, ideas, and beliefs. For example, we tend to overestimate the amount we contributed to a team project.

The bias can make it more challenging to understand other people's perspectives. It can cause us to misinterpret situations and make poor judgements.

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