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This Is How a Great Mentor Could Boost Your Career and Life

The Mentee's Responsibilities

  • Have the willingness to learn and be open to positive or negative feedback.
  • Do not hesitate to ask for advice and use this chance to practice being a good listener.
  • Let your mentor know what your goals are.
  • Discuss with your mentor how you can best measure the success and effectiveness of your working relationship together.
  • Always follow your appointments.
  • Keep track of your discussions with your mentor and follow up specifically on those steps when you meet.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

This Is How a Great Mentor Could Boost Your Career and Life

This Is How a Great Mentor Could Boost Your Career and Life

https://www.thebalancecareers.com/a-guide-to-understanding-the-role-of-a-mentor-2275318

thebalancecareers.com

6

Key Ideas

Mentoring and Coaching

The terms mentoring and coaching are often mistakenly interchanged. Although they are similar, they are not the same when it comes to approach.

  • Mentoring - long-term relationship focusing on the growth and development of the mentee with the mentor as the source of the wisdom, support, and knowledge.
  • Coaching - short-term relationship focusing on strengthening traits and eliminating behaviors that diminishes one's performance.

History and Definition of Mentorship

The word "mentor" was first used in Homer's epic poem "The Odyssey" when Odysseus entrusted the care of his kingdom to Mentor who served as a teacher and overseer to Odysseus' son.

This is where mentor was derived meaning "a trusted councelor or guide."

Why Seek Out a Mentor

A mentor is not someone who gives you direct answers, but someone who challenges you to know the right answer. 

And in life, you can't be spoon-fed all the time. The role of a mentor is to guide you and give you the wisdom in knowing the answer.

A Mentor Does and Does not

A mentor..

  • Takes a long-range view of your growth and development.
  • Helps you see the destination but does not give you the detailed map to get there.
  • Offers encouragement and cheerleading, but not "how to" advice.

A mentor does not..

  • Serve as a coach as explained above.
  • Function as an advocate of yours in the organizational environment such as your boss would; the relationship is more informal.
  • Tell you how to do things.
  • Support you on transactional, short-term problems.
  • Serve as a counselor or therapist. 

The Mentee's Responsibilities

  • Have the willingness to learn and be open to positive or negative feedback.
  • Do not hesitate to ask for advice and use this chance to practice being a good listener.
  • Let your mentor know what your goals are.
  • Discuss with your mentor how you can best measure the success and effectiveness of your working relationship together.
  • Always follow your appointments.
  • Keep track of your discussions with your mentor and follow up specifically on those steps when you meet.

Succeed With a Mentor

  1. Use your time looking for the mentor you are comfortable with.
  2. Share your goals and fears openly.
  3. Do not expect your mentor to spoon-feed you.
  4. Do not expect specific advice.
  5. Share your struggles and failures.
  6. Listen, research and apply your mentor's guidance.
  7. Show that you value your mentor's support.
  8. Do not abuse your relationship by expecting political support in the organization.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Mentoring

Mentoring is about being able pass knowledge to someone who would benefit from it.

Mentoring programs usually have four key elements:

  • Improving performance
The Roles of a Mentor
  • M-anage the relationship
  • E-ncourage
  • N-urture
  • T-each
  • O-ffer mutual respect
  • R-espond to the learner's needs
Different Roles of the Mentor
  • Learning Consultant: The mentor must help the learner to clarify his goals and identify the learning style needed.
  • Coach: The mentor should have the will to help the learner explore the problem and try new ways of working.
  • Counselor: When the learner is struggling to think, the mentor could listen, reflect, and clarify to help the learner gain insight.
  • Adviser or Information Resource: Share insights with the learner for faster and better understanding.
  • Role Model: Sometimes, the learner does not only learn from what the mentor teaches, but from how the mentor acts.
  • Critical Friend: The mentor can also simply be a friend, however, it is the most difficult because it requires the willingness to listen, encourage, draw out, reflect, challenge, and provide feedback about ideas.

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Roles of a Mentor
  • Advisor and Coach - provides advice, guidance,and feedback.
  • Champion and Cheerleader - inspires and motivates the mentee to try new things, move out of comfort zone, and...
Roles of a Mentee
  • Identify learning goals and style and measure success for the mentoring relationship.
  • Be open and seek feedback.
  • Be active in learning.
  • Schedule and attend mentor appointments.
  • Follow through on commitments and take informed risks as they try new options and behaviors in support of career and development goals.
What Makes a Good Mentor
  • Sincere and have the desire to develop and help others even without any price.
  • Prepared to commit time and energy to the mentoring relationship.
  • Have the relev...
What Makes a Good Mentee
  • He's committed to expanding capabilities and focused on achieving professional results.
  • Clear about their career goals, needs, and wants.
  • Willing to ask for help.
  • Able to seek and accept positive or negative feedback.
  • Personally responsible and accountable.
  • Ready, willing, and able to meet on a regular basis.
The Mentoring Relationship

To develop a successful mentoring relationships:

  • Design the Alliance. Both parties must have an agreement on the contact and response times, meetings, confidentiality, focus, feedback, and goals and accountability.
  • Get to Know Each Other. It is important to have a strong relationship and trust before focusing on the problem.
  • Set the Agenda. Be clear on the purpose and goals of the program.
  • Reflect and Evaluate. Know if there is a progress or development gained from the mentoring every few meetings.
  • Closeout. Before parting ways, have a closure with each other. Reflect and appreciate what both parties have learned and gained from the experience.
Find a matching mentee

If you decide on becoming a mentor, you might want to consider choosing a mentee who shares your interests. It will make everyone's life easier. Moreover, you will also be able to provide more ...

Building effective mentoring relationships

Mentoring requires having a clear idea of how the sessions themselves are to happen. 

Make sure that from the very beginning you communicate to your mentee exactly how all is going to take place: how often, where, how, etc. Get to know the other and use all the means you dispose of in order to help him or her reach the desired goal.

A mentor's real purpose

More than giving directions, a mentor is supposed to provide the so-called pieces of supportive advice, which will enable the mentee to make up her or his mind, based on their own beliefs.

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A Good Mentee
A Good Mentee

Having the right mentor or ‘Guru’ in our life can change one's entire trajectory. It’s common to see people labelled as good mentors, but rare for anyone to make themselves into good mentees.

Characteristics Of Mentorability
  1. Valuing the most precious resource being provided by the mentor: Time.
  2. Being clear about one’s expectations and objectives, so that the most suitable and effective guidance is provided.
  3. Being open to input, advice, criticism and feedback, ready to hear things you wouldn’t normally want to hear.
  4. Expressing Gratitude.
  5. Self-assessing yourself as a good mentee, committing to the partnership.
  6. Expecting the unexpected, and learning from it.
Understand Your Performance Evaluation

Find out if your performance evaluation is according to what you understand. Identify your goals and key performance indicators with your manager, and discuss accordingly.

Solve your Blind Spots

Ask for feedback, learn from it and adjust your performance (or behavior) according to the areas of improvement that you get to know from others.

Example: After giving a presentation, talk about what went well and ask if there is something that you could have done better.

Keep a Journal

Keeping a journal with a record of your learnings and feedback (areas of improvement) can keep us on the right path, and speed up our progress, and learning too.

Listing out 5 or 10 areas of improvement and tracking the progress in weekly or monthly reviews is a great way to develop your career.

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Mentoring

... is not about negotiating with someone to teach you, but a two-way street. It takes time to build that connection needed to be able to teach and learn.

Mentor #1: The Master of Craft

They are like actual Jedi masters who possess wisdom acquired from experiences.

Turn to this person when you need advice about launching a new initiative or brainstorming where you should work next

Mentor #2: The Champion of Your Cause

They could not just be your personal mentor but could also be your link to other useful people in the industry.

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Defining your career
Your career is defined by your skills and how you’ve used them, not by any external measure of your progress.

If you focus exclusively on improving your skills and your impact on your organiz...

Treat your manager as a coach

A good manager’s job is to help you and the rest of your team get better results. So it would be logical that she should be invested in your career. When you do better, then by extension, she does better. 

Hence, your manager should be on your side, who wants you to succeed, and who is willing to spend a good deal of time and energy to help you do that.

See yourself succeeding

There is research that shows if you can create a clear visualization of yourself achieving the outcome you want, you prime yourself to act in a way that is consistent with what you imagine.

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Agile leadership

Focuses on fast decision making, short-term goals, and the empowerment of individuals

And it has expanded to include general leadership skills like acting on a shared vision, le...

The 2 elements of the servant leadership
  • Vision: Creating a shared vision is the leadership part of servant leadership;
  • Implementation: Helping people implement that vision is the servant part of servant leadership.

Agile leaders are servant leaders.

Situational Leadership® II (SLII®)

It's a servant leadership model taught by The Ken Blanchard Companies, based on the belief that leadership style should be tailored to the situation

This kind of flexibility is a key principle of agile organizations.

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