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Problem Solving

82 STASHED IDEAS

A logical fallacy is reasoning that contains a flaw.

Many logical fallacies rely on false premises:

  • Appeal to nature - claiming something is good because it is "natural". Some natural things, like cyanide, is very bad for you.
  • False dilemma - a limited number of options are presented as mutually exclusive or as the only options.
  • The appeal to novelty - when something is assumed good because it is new.
  • The argument from incredulity - someone concludes that because they can't believe something is true, then it must be false.
Evan Y. (@evan_yy) - Profile Photo

@evan_yy

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Problem Solving

effectiviology.com

From early on, chefs and cooks are trained in the art of mise-en-place. In preparation for a particular dish, every single item needed is in front of them before they even turn the water to a boil. They know what ingredients need to be added first and which utensil to use. They always know what step they're working on and never confused about what comes next.

We can make projects feel like a recipe where we move through the work step-by-step, starting with the end in sight.

Any subject can be learned with some practice and patience. Some subjects may appear harder because of the speed at which they are taught.

To fix this problem, you may need to put in more work. If you can't see everything at once, it just means you need to practice more of the pieces, so your mind does not have to juggle so many ideas simultaneously.

Note-Taking

Note-taking will always be at the core of learning and education. We are often encouraged to take notes during lectures to have a record of the knowledge being shared by our teachers and gain a sense of familiarity with the subject.

There are many note-taking systems such as outlining, guided notes, and the famous Cornell notes. However, they do not result well when being recalled. No studies suggest that Cornell note-taking improves a student's performance better than free-flow writing.

  • Step 1: Pick something you want to learn. Spend time with the idea until you have internalized it as best you can.
  • Step 2: From memory, write everything down that you know about the subject in a way that a child can understand. Write the items down that you don't remember and find answers for those items.
  • Step 3: Question every line you have written down. Some things you will understand, but at some point, you will write things down that you don't know. Then find the answers to these new topics.
  • Step 4: Repeat step 3 until the questioning adds no incremental value. Reorganize the various information you found interesting. Then question your own information to see if there are more gaps in your understanding.

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