Time Management

89 STASHED IDEAS

Small behavioural hacks can assist in better working habits and lead to huge payoffs.

Consider what habits you want to change, then modify your environment to support those behaviours. For example, if you want to read more, keep books or your kindle next to your bed and put your phone further away. If you want to check social media less often, delete those apps from your phone.

Holden Y. (@holyy23) - Profile Photo

@holyy23

Time Management

We are all writers. Our success at work or school is partly determined by our ability to communicate through email, reports, projects, and maybe articles or books.

Reading your work out loud makes it easier to test if it sounds right. It helps to make your writing clearer, exact, and more impactful.

A study found that most people lose about two seconds per minute of work using their mouse instead of keyboard shortcuts. That amounts to eight days a year.

Learning keyboard shortcuts can increase your productivity. Most software shares the same shortcuts - learning a few shortcuts will make you faster.

Research found we get 22% less work done when we have a meeting coming up in the next hour or two.

Consider creating rules around your schedule. Batching emails, calls, meetings, or virtual events can leave a longer timespan for you to focus on work without distractions.

Being productive means being efficient

Being productive is not about doing more. It is about doing things efficiently.

You have the same number of hours in the day as successful authors, musicians, entertainers, entrepreneurs, and business leaders. Investing time in some simple strategies and making small changes can help you get more out of your day.

FOMO is not only decreasing productivity, but it can also cause information overload. For example, when something exciting happens early in the day, it can consume so much information that a person can reach his limit.

His productivity will decrease and affect overall workload progress. Worse is that the information was not even valuable or beneficial to perform his task at the office.

The following issues can affect some people and should be taken seriously.

  • The fear of not being asked to attend an important meeting.
  • The fear of not being able to participate in a meeting.
  • The fear of not being invited to a company retreat or office party.
  • The fear of not being able to take part in a lunch break group chat.
Fear of missing out (FOMO) in the workplace

People suffering from the fear of missing out have a real need to be in the know of everything. They want to see all the news and events, any office activity they want to be a part of and are always busy commenting on Facebook posts or tweeting on Twitter.

But FOMO can negatively affect productivity in the workplace.

  • At the end of each day, take a brief pause and review how the day went.
  • Celebrate any progress at all.
  • Take a few more minutes to set your intentions/Win the Day items for the next day.

We don’t have to wait for the end of the day to celebrate. We can do it after anything we do. 

The practice is a simple ritual: pause when you’re done with something, before you move on to the next thing. Reflect. And celebrate.

Winning The Day

Instead of starting the day with a list of tasks to get done, start it by identifying 1-3 things that would make this day an absolute victory if you were to do them.

If you can get those done, it will be a big victory for your goals. And then look back on it at the end of the day and celebrate what you can.

The best predictor of getting things done

The secret to great productivity is simply to do what you enjoy.

Copying other successful people will not guarantee you success: Just because Elon Musk works 120 hours a week does not mean that you'll have the same success if you work for 120 hours a week. Musk likes to work those hours. If you tried to follow that schedule, you'd have to make yourself do it. The same goes to advice like "write every day." It won't work unless you want to write.

One big fear we have is that when we let ourselves do what we enjoy, we'd waste even more hours each day on social media, instead of doing important things.

But we know that when we start a session of challenging work, we often need to give ourselves a push. After that, it's the enjoyment that'll sustain our motivation, not productivity hacks.

Instead of watching the clock, energy management can be used instead of time management. Our positive mood is high in the morning, dips in the afternoon, and rises again in the evening. We can use this information to our advantage and plan for our high-priority work when our mood is high and do low-priority work during our low mood hours.

Not everyone is the same, so it's worth figuring out when you're most productive and schedule your tasks accordingly.

There are some general areas that all of us should prioritize in order to function well and generally make life worthwhile. These areas are:

  • Health and fitness. Bad health and fitness habits add up over time and have a knock-on effect in other areas of our lives.
  • Sleep and rest. Inadequate sleep leads to unstable emotions, impaired learning, imbalanced hormones and a compromised cardiovascular system.
  • Friends, family, and relationships. It's hard to mend relationships once they've been frayed. Be proactive about being the connector and decide beforehand what you won't miss out on.
  • Productive work. Instead of working harder, we should work smarter (more strategically.)

Intentionally take your focus away from distracting areas in your life.

  • Social media and entertainment. While they can add fun to our days, it's worth reducing how much time we spend on apps.
  • Busy work. These are tasks we do regularly but that fail to move us forward. These tasks should be delegated, automated, limited, or deleted.
  • Negativity. When we focus on the negative, we are prevented from seeing reality clearly. It is then important to be aware of your inner thoughts. Maintain a running record of positive things people say about you.

The Time Blocking productivity method compels you to plan your day hour by hour, and prevent multitasking by batching similar tasks together.

  • Make a to-do list for the day.
  • Categorize hour tasks together in similar blocks.
  • Estimate how long each block of tasks will take.
  • Add each block to your schedule sequentially with a time attached.
  • Complete each block of tasks from morning to evening in order.
  • Modify or postpone blocks of time when needed.

Ensure that at least one of your blocks of time is related to your most important tasks/projects.

Accepting that you can't do everything

The antidote to chronic overwhelm is accepting that you cannot do it all.

Prioritizing means embracing the limits of your time and your energy, and taking back control of your to-do list. Embrace tactical strategies to ensure your priorities rise to the top amid the busyness of life.

  • Identify your hardest, most important task for the day.
  • Do your most important task first thing in the morning. Don't put it off for later.

This productivity system is known as Eat the Frog. Using this method will enable you to prioritize the important every day and build momentum for the hours ahead.

The Commitment Inventory productivity method makes us take stock of all our commitments and forces us to take a look at them.

  • Create an exhaustive list of everything you spend time on.
  • Consolidate into categories and assign a percentage to each.
  • Trim your list of commitments, ensuring each category has enough time to do it well.
  • Organize your to-do list around your categories.
  • Break big tasks down into checklists.
  • Work in timed "bursts" aligned with your categories.

Ensure your priorities are reflected in your categories.

Understanding importance over urgency

The Eisenhower Matrix system forces us to prioritize important tasks over urgent tasks.

Put your tasks in one of four separate categories:

  • Urgent and Important tasks/projects to be completed immediately.
  • Not Urgent & Important tasks/projects to be scheduled on your calendar.
  • Urgent & Unimportant tasks/projects to be delegated to someone else.
  • Not Urgent & Unimportant tasks/projects to be deleted.

Warren Buffett's "2 List" Strategy focuses on getting rid of the tasks holding you back from your real priorities.

  • Write down 25 things you want to accomplish.
  • Select your top 5 priorities from this list.
  • Cross out the remaining 20 items and actively avoid thinking about them.
  • Focus only on your top 5 priorities.
  • Make a habit of gathering all your to-dos in one place - from email, personal tasks like cooking meals, to new ideas for projects. Capture your tasks in a productivity system and add a date when you need to do it.
  • Stay focused by eliminating distractions. Use an app blocker to reduce social media and entertainment when you need to get things done.
  • Don't fall for shiny object syndrome. When boredom creeps into our routine, it's easy to get distracted with something new.

© Brainstash, Inc

AboutCuratorsJobsPress KitTopicsTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicySitemap