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Self Improvement

105 SAVED IDEAS

William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
  • He was the song of a glover and a grammar-school boy that attended Stratford
  • He is famously known as the world's greatest playwright who had a dynamic duality within himself
  • He had become an icon for English-speaking people throughout the world just like how Dante is for the Italians and Goethe for the Germans
  • Shakespeare was a person who kept to himself and died a mysterious man.

@jaybarr

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Self Improvement

Shakespeare forever changed English life, language, and culture. He entwined poetry and storytelling in visionary ways. He is an enigma who contributed many remarkable phrases such as "all that glitters is gold," give the devil his due," and many more.

He also contributed about 1700 words to the English language. Many vernaculars were braided with their Latin coinages that revamped the English language.

Shakespeare's most famous play, Hamlet, exhibits the man's inner workings, being agonized by complex strife with himself and his own desires. 

It is a lurid event of post-renaissance drama in which psychology is articulated through brilliant poetry. 

Shakespeare articulated both to the high and low culture his existential vision of human frailty.

Shakespeare's effect on The American Dream

Shakespeare is an indispensable part of the American dream because Shakespeare's great dramas are held up to a society that is permanently in search of themselves.  

His statue in NYC Park was erected to symbolize the role of Shakespeare in American life.

David Garrick, an actor, rekindled Shakespeare's reputation in the 18th century through a Jubilee which was thrown to honor Shakespeare in 1769. 

Even former US presidents, Jefferson and Adams, visited Shakespeare's birthplace and grave, to which they wrote "these was nothing preserved of this great genius."

Shakespeare's effect on Film

Many Hollywood scriptwriters latched on to Shakespeare's plots and icons. 

Films such as Throne of Blood by Kurosawa, My Own Private Idaho by Gus van Sant, and Ran the classic Japanese film were all inspired by Shakespeare's work Macbeth, Henry IV, and King Lear.

Shakespeare was described as "not a company keeper" and was usually engaged with literary and theatre business to dwindle and waste time on self-publicity.

He understood that it was the work that mattered, not the brouhaha that accompanied it. Much said he had no interest in posterity.

Shakespeare heavily influenced Sigmund Freud's work. 

Freud recognized Shakespeares' strong interest in the mind of man and applied Shakespeare's insight throughout his own psychoanalytic works.

When Shakespeare wrote, "There's no art to find the mind's construction in the face." Freud saw the potential that it was something he could open discourse on.

Shakespeare's effect on History

Richard III was about Richard of Gloucester who wants to be King of England. Richard was a jealous cripple who used manipulation and deceit in order to achieve his goal. 

He had murdered his brothers, nephews, and anyone who was opposed to him. 

Shakespeare caricatured Richard III's ambition to "seem a saint when most I play the devil" 

The play still resonates as a lethal blend of tragedy and history.

It was resurrected in America as a commentary on Richard Nixon's abuse of power. 

Shakespeare's effect on Refugees

Shakespeare wrote an ardent plea for sympathy and understanding towards the unfortunate situation of refugees. 

The document demonstrates Shakespeare's unerringly drawn to a timeless theme of -- the fate of the dispossessed. Sir Thomas More was a Shakespearean play that tells the real-life statesman to quell an anti-immigrant riot.

Shakespeare's effect on Music

Many musicals on Broadway are inspired by Shakespeare's work from West Side Story to Kiss Me, Kate, many of his plays are performed constantly around the world because his works are truly unparalleled.

About Volcanoes
  • Most volcanoes are formed when the boundaries of our planet's tectonic plates collide and overlap, eventually sinking deep inside.
  • Many get life by ‘hotspot volcanism’ which is the magmatic activity at the center of the tectonic plate.
  • Volcanoes have created the foundation of the land on our planet, crafting mountains, craters, soil beds and eventually making up to 80 percent of our surface.
  • About 1500 of them are active as of 2018.

75 percent of the active volcanoes of our planet are around the ring of fire, which is a horseshoe-shaped zone starting from South to North America, then moving towards Japan and New Zealand. Apart from the flowing molten lava, an active volcano produces avalanches of hot rocks, ash and toxic gas through superfast explosions.

The volcanic mudflows, or ‘lahars’ are capable of wiping out entire towns.

Scientists closely monitor volcanoes that are near a large population for signs of probable eruption, like increased gas emission. Like the weather, the signs can be misleading and unpredictable.

At least a dozen eruptions happen daily and increased network footprint and media coverage ensures that no such eruptions go unreported.

The 1815 Indonesian explosion in Mount Tambora is considered the largest and deadliest known volcanic eruption, killing 10,000 people right away and about 82,000 more eventually due to starvation and disease.

Our Relationships With Stress

Every single one of us experiences stress on a daily basis. It is the mental and emotional strain that comes from needing to resolve demanding circumstances.

We have the capability to look into the future by anticipating behaviors and studying patterns, unlike any living creature. The power to imagine entire realities is both a curse and a blessing that motivates us and makes us behave in strange ways. But, we are not doomed to be in an eternal state of constant stress.

Since the stress that we experience is based on our own perspective of anticipating the next events, we must then understand that every time we anticipate a threatening situation the body releases stress hormones in order for us to prepare and face the threat.

However, if we believe that we have control over the threatening stimulus then we won't need to prepare the survival response that we rely on.

The most important thing when it comes to wanting to regain a sense of control within ourselves is that we must practice how to change our focus from the things we are unable to control to the ones that we can.

We have the tendency to focus on the threats and the problems that we've been given but we must remember that for the sake of our emotional wellbeing, our perception of reality is created by the focus of our attention.

Our beliefs about stress is also a factor we have to consider. Since we see stress as a negative thing that we must avoid, it's only going to continue to threaten our health instead of perceiving it as something that is a normal part of life.

If we halt from the perception of it as being abnormal and choose to see it in a different light as something that empowers us to do our best and to be our best version of ourselves.

There is a way for us to be able to use stress as an element for our success. When we intentionally push ourselves outside of our comfort zone and then set days where we rest, our capacity for stress actually increases therefore future difficulties would not seem like a bother, but instead as a fun and thrilling adventure.

This then becomes what's normal to our bodies and therefore creating an environment where we experience less stress because we have control over the stressors.

"Stress is not your enemy. You can take control of it or you can let it control you. The choice is yours".
Baby Yoda has captured the imagination

Baby Yoda is the star of the television series, The Mandalorian, in the Star Wars film universe. It is a small, green-skinned, big-eared alien who can wield "the force."

The ways in which Baby Yoda's creators have modelled him on human attributes can give us insights into how and why people think certain beings and behaviours lovable.

Baby Yoda's features are similar to human babies, such as his big, beautiful eyes, oversized ears, and clumsy short limbs.

However, his charms reach beyond his adorable appearance. His behaviour and the responses he draws out are what melts the hearts of people.

The narrative of The Mandalorian series centres around the unlikely bond between a hardened bounty hunter, known as Mando, and the seemingly helpless Baby Yoda.

Baby Yoda is similar to a 14-month-old human. He's mobile and mostly nonverbal, and copies behaviour from adults. Actions such as making eye contact and giggling, sharing toys or other items, waving, and reaching out, make people feel more attached to babies.

As babies grow older, they start to incorporate other behaviours, such as hugging and gifting, that help to create a bond between themselves and potential caregivers.

The cute looks may draw them in, but their social actions keep others interested. These are the behaviours that convince Mando to care, protect, and make Baby Yoda part of their tribe.

Potential Unexpressed Turns Into Pain

If you want to learn and grow, and lift, and expand, we need to stop doing stuff like playing games, or wasting time on our smartphones, as that is only a life of mediocrity.

We betray our genius, welling up the psychic pain inside us and start to disrespect ourselves when we hide our true potential and just tolerate life.

  • We lose the sparkle in our eyes, not caring for anything and resigning ourselves in the cult of mediocrity as we live a so-called normal life.
  • We need to up our game and become world-class at our work, using up our potential to the maximum.
  • It is our choice if we want to live like everyone else or become the chosen one.

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