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Self Improvement

89 STASHED IDEAS

Wanting to be liked by everyone

Many people go through life desiring everyone to like them - not just a boss or a co-worker but strangers - the customer-service reps, cab drivers, or people in the grocery store.

Just telling yourself, it doesn't matter if the others like you is bad advice. You know it doesn't affect your life on an intellectual level whether this stranger thinks you're wonderful, but that doesn't stop you from wanting them to.

Alfie Easton (@aeaston) - Profile Photo

@aeaston

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Self Improvement

The inkblot consists of patterns where you have to explain what you see. What a person sees says more about them than it does about the inkblot.

The same thing is true interpersonally. The qualities that make you likeable to one person will make you unlikable to another person. Research shows that people like other people with personalities most similar to their own. You can't control the preferences of the other person.

Put yourself in the context of the whole world. Imagine spending a week interacting with all 7 billion people on the planet. Then consider what percentage of those people would say that you're generally a likeable person.

For example, thinking that around 70 percent of people would like you means 30 percent wouldn't. That means out of 7 billion people, 2.1 billion wouldn't like you. That is a lot of people. You're going to be disliked. That means shrug it off and move on.

Many factors influence how someone might feel about you.

Someone might be having a bad day, or they may be distracted by their workload. All are aspects beyond your control. The factors may influence how people respond to you, but they're not about you.

When someone comes across as neither obviously friendly nor overly hostile, most people will find it difficult to read them accurately.

That means many neutral encounters end up being perceived as negative ones. People who are sensitive to rejection may assume other people will shut them out. Recognizing our own skewed perception of the world is a first step toward solving it. With classic cognitive behavioural therapy techniques, we can learn to reinterpret other people's behaviour.

We all have some problematic thought patterns that we are unaware of.

  • One is mind-reading, where you wrongly assume that whoever you're with is thinking negative thoughts about you.
  • Another is personalising, making something about you when it isn't.
  • Or catastrophising, where you assume the worst-case scenario.

The key is to figure out which ones apply to you. Consider which assumptions do you have about yourself that skewed your perception of what happened.

Lao Tzu

“Silence is a source of great strength.”

To escape the chaos of our daily lives, many of us try to meditate, mistaking it for another activity, something we have to do.

The concept of sitting still is doing absolutely nothing, a concept alien to many of us with a mindset of always doing stuff.

Lao Tzu

“Activity conquers cold, but stillness conquers heat.”

Stillness has a strength, a calming effect on us and our surroundings. Our being still slows down the world around us, allowing us to focus and concentrate on the essential.

To be still takes courage in this frenetic, chaotic world where everyone is always in a rush. Being still allows us to find the strength from within, rather than outside.

This act of inaction is not natural to us, as we are never taught to just be, but to always do something.

But just by pausing, closing your eyes and sitting still for a minute and just focusing on your breath as it happens is the antidote to all the stress that the noise creates.

  • Find a time in the early morning hours when it is quiet, making sure you don’t fill your mind with junk and anxiety by checking your phone notifications.
  • Just sit and try to be comfortable with the concept of doing nothing: no drinking, no snacking, no planning your day. Just embracing calm.
  • Gradually, you will find other pockets of time during the day when you can just be, and your calmness will help you create stuff, exercise, work and do everything more effectively.
The Microchip

Smaller than a fingernail, Microchips are integrated circuits providing computer circuitry that is one of the most important inventions of the human race.

A microchip is basically an interconnected circuitry of transistors and resistors etched on semiconducting material like germanium or silicon. The Microprocessor of a computer, and the computer memory, both contain microchip circuits. Most modern gadgets contain this piece of technology.

  • Jack Kilby and Robert Noyce are credited for the creation of microchips.
  • In 1959, Texas Instruments received the patent for mini electronic circuits, and inventor Jack Kilby rose to prominence.
  • Apart from the mini chips, he also invented the calculator and holds more than 60 patents.
  • A company of Robert Noyce, Fairchild Semiconductor Corporation, got the silicon chips patented. He later founded the company Intel.

Built on multiple layers, microchip makers use a process called photolithography using chemicals and light. It is generally covered with a thin layer of aluminium.

Apart from computers and laptops, Smartphones are the most common electronic devices carrying a whole lot of chips. Television sets, GPS devices, ID cards and Air Force missiles use this technology.

Gratitude: Personal And Interpersonal
  • The year gone by has made practising gratitude popular, promoting it as an instrument to enhance one’s personal wellbeing.
  • Gratitude is a complex and interpersonal emotion that feels incomplete by itself and has to have an addressee, a specific person other than oneself.
  • Being thankful for your own health, luck, good looks is a positive and beneficial action but is a feeling that can be described as appreciation and is generally personal.

The 18th-century American preacher Jonathan Edwards defined gratitude as a natural affection felt toward another person who has benefited us.

Gratitude is generally interpersonal and can induce positive feelings even toward our foes.

  • In 56 CE, the Stoic philosopher Seneca wrote a comprehensive book on gratitude, called On Benefits.
  • The gifted philosopher treats the feeling of gratitude as a virtue that one needs to cultivate and implement socially.
  • In his book, gratitude is defined as a glue that holds society together and makes it thrive.
  • More than just acting out and reciprocating the benefits received, it is crucial to actually feel the gratitude from within.

Positive psychologists have credited gratitude (both personal and interpersonal) with:

  1. Improving our emotional wellbeing.
  2. Promoting prosocial behaviour.
  3. Helping us regulate our emotions.
  4. Relieving symptoms of asthma.
  • A gift has certain psychological aspects attached to it, making it more than just a simple transaction.
  • A gift binds the recipient to the giver, and is seen as a burden. The word ‘grateful’ can also be translated in the Hebrew language to ‘A prisoner of thankfulness’.
  • A gift can also have a flavour of humiliation, like when a captive person or a hostage is provided with a cup of tea.
The 1940 and 1944 games

Tokyo and Sapporo, Japan, had been originally set to host the 1940 Olympic Games (summer and winter), making them the first non-Western cities selected to host. But the war between Japan and China started in July 1937 and made the Japanese government decide to lose their right to host the Games.
The new hosts: Helsinki, Finland (for summer) and Garmisch-Partenkirchen Germany (for winter). But the outbreak of World War II caused the events to be canceled entirely, after the Nazi invasion of Poland in September 1939. The same happened with the 1944’s Summer Olympics in London and Winter Games in Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy.

The 1916 Summer Olympics

The Berlin Games were canceled due to the outbreak of World War I in July 1914.

Organizers initially thought that the war would be over by Christmas but an armistice was not reached until November 1918.

Postponing the 2020 Olympics

The postponement of Tokyo 2020 was not a decision taken lightly: it came after the pressure to cancel or delay the event due to the risks of the new virus.
The financial blow of canceling the games will be substantial for Japan, which has already invested at least $12.6 billion into the 2020 Olympics; by some estimates, it would reduce Japan’s annual GDP growth by 1.4%.

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