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Health

79 STASHED IDEAS

Games with racquets hitting balls have been going on since the Neolithic times. Ruins in Mesoamerica show signs of ball games played in various cultures thousands of years ago.

Greeks, Romans and Egyptians have played games resembling modern tennis.

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Health

  • The game of tennis was originally a game of the rich, played by male players in hats and ties, and women in corsets and bustles.
  • It adopted a strict dress code in the 1890s, and white clothing became the official tennis attire. This dress code wasn't a great option for middle-class or working-class people, as pristine white had to be laundered, something that was expensive.
  • Later the swinging sixties made tennis attire rules relaxed, and new appliances like the washing machine made washing clothes easier and affordable to the working class, making it a viable option for many more people.

The famous scoring technique of Tennis: Love, 15, 30, 40, deuce originated in France. The game was divided into a 60 point system due to its association with medieval numerology. 40 (quarante) was used instead of 45 (quarante cinq) as it was shorter in french.

The term love came from the word l'oeuf which means nothing or an egg (signifying zero).

A version of modern tennis, played without racquets (using palms of the hand) by French monks was called jeu de paume, or the Game Of The Palm.

It was upgraded in the year 1500 ADE with wooden racquets, and balls made of leather and cork. The game became extremely popular in England where about 1800 indoor courts came up.

Outdoor Tennis And Sphairistikè

By the 18th century, the rubber ball made the game popular again, as it had the ability to be played outdoors on grass.

A version of the game called Sphairistikè was played in an hourglass-shaped court in London, creating a sensation in the whole of Europe in the year 1873. This later evolved into a rectangular court, with women not allowed until 1884.

People have always believed that beauty products are safe because they could buy them at the store. Yet, additives like long-chain carbons (PFAS), phthalates, and triclosan can disrupt hormones, and formaldehyde found in shampoos and keratin treatments is carcinogenic.

Because these products cannot be assumed safe, it has sparked a movement geared towards getting rid of controversial ingredients in our personal products.

There is no uniform meaning of "clean beauty" and no rules regulating it, which means that one company will define clean beauty differently from another company.

One "clean" foundation product could cause allergies and reproductive toxicity, while another foundation from a "clean beauty" company could receive an EWG stamp of approval for safety. But not all companies disclose everything, and you can only go so far if companies are not transparent about everything.

"Clean" cosmetic products  trend

Some of the ingredients in personal care products are not ideal.

"Clean Beauty" products list supposedly ethical qualities ranging from cruelty-free to fragrance-free to formaldehyde-free. But without regulations to back up the word "clean", the term "clean beauty" could be greenwashed.

Various scandals have come to light over the years, but the FDA doesn't have the authority to intervene in personal products. Johnson & Johnson knew for over 40 years that their talc baby powder contained asbestos. If shampoo causes people's hair to fall out, the company doesn't have to share that information.

Any company can call itself "clean." It becomes a question of why anyone cannot simply walk into a store to buy a safe product.

The First-Night Effect: The Reason We Can’t Sleep At A New Place
  • Known as the First-Night Effect, many of us aren’t able to sleep properly at a new place the first time.
  • The reason for this, according to research, is that half our brain (the left hemisphere, mostly) stays awake in alert mode. This area of the brain is called the default-mode network and is responsible for being active while we daydream or wander in our thoughts.
  • The unfamiliarity of the new place, and the many unknowns in the area surrounding us, makes the brain stay half-awake, resulting in poor sleep.
Tracking your caffeine intake

According to the FDA, 400 milligrams of coffee is deemed to have any harmful effects on healthy adults. However, those who are pregnant and suffer from anxiety and panic disorders should drink no more than 200 milligrams per day.

If you believe that caffeine is worsening your anxiety, keep a diary with you at all times to keep track of your caffeine intake and anxiety symptoms and log them. Check your logs to see if there are any patterns that show up.

While coffee is one of life's simple pleasures that most of us are unable to resist, here are ways on how to cut back on caffeine intake:

  1. Drink gradually. Slow down and take your time while drinking coffee. If you start to experience jitters, it's time to stop.
  2. Change up your coffee order. You'd be surprised that a shot of espresso has less caffeine than a drip of coffee.
  3. Switch to decaffeinated coffee or herbal tea.

The explanation behind the surge of energy you get from drinking coffee is: caffeine blocks the receptors that are meant to be for adenosine.

Adenosine plays a number of bodily functions, but during our bodies' waking hours it builds up in the receptors which causes us to feel sleepy and less alert. So, when we intake caffeinated drinks, the caffeine blocks the receptors that are meant for the adenosine to build up and also could trigger the release of adrenaline.

Caffeine worsens your anxiety

Drinks such as coffee, sodas, energy drinks, tea, and chocolate, all contain caffeine.

People who have anxiety disorders and panic disorders are generally more sensitive to the effects of caffeine. The stimulants in caffeine can mimic and heighten symptoms of anxiety when consumed in large amounts. It can rapidly increase your heartbeat or even make your body feel restless

There’s no simple answer as to whether microwaving vegetables will retain more nutrients that any other method, because each food is different in terms of the texture and nutrients they contain.

Studies show that shorter cooking times tend to not compromise nutritional content. Steaming and microwaving could even increase content of most flavonoids, which are compounds linked to reduced risk of heart disease.

  • We often microwave foods in plastic containers and wrapping and this comes wit a risk: the risk of ingesting phthalates. When exposed to heat, these plastic additives can break down and leach into food.
  • Phthalates are common (in toys and body lotions for example) and it’s still unclear just how much damage they do. But most experts agree that heating plastic with phthalates can increase exposure.
  • The best way to avoid this is to use other microwave-safe materials than plastic, such as ceramic. If you do use plastic containers, avoid any that are losing their shape, since old and damaged containers are more likely to leach chemicals.

Microwaves use low frequency electromagnetic radiation (same as in lightbulbs and radios).

When you put food inside a microwave, it absorbs these microwaves, which makes water molecules in the food vibrate, causing friction that heats up the food. Humans absorb electromagnetic waves, too. But microwave ovens produce relatively low frequency waves and they are contained inside the microwave.

The debates around microwave cooking

When used correctly, there’s nothing to worry about in terms of a microwave’s radiation, according to the World Health Organization.

But other concerns are less clear: for example, whether microwaving food causes nutrient loss, or whether heating food in plastic can trigger hormone disruption.

  • Even if you avoid plastics, there are other potential risks of heating food in the microwave – including uneven heating, and the high temperatures used.
  • Consider using microwaves to reheat, rather than cook, food, as it may cook unevenly.
  • Reheating food comes with risks, too. Food must be heated until it is 82C (176F) throughout to kill any harmful bacteria, and because bacteria can still grow each time food cools back down, you shouldn’t reheat a meal more than once.

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