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Career

66 STASHED IDEAS

We all worry about our own productivity, but fail to see that it is interconnected with other colleagues, peers, bosses and subordinates, which are sharing the same ecosystem and goals.

In shared leadership, individuals can be navigators to set the direction or to orchestrate tasks, engineers to solve problems, integrators to facilitate communication and interactive activities, and liaisons to act as connectors to external partners

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@zaram52

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Career

A role exchange mindset promotes self-selection of roles and responsibilities as per the person best suited for the particular task or project. It also takes into account that each team member isn’t available at all times, and the task at hand will evolve and change hands.

People have to be comfortable with going back-and-forth with their roles and responsibilities, switching between leading and following.

A leader with an ego is a bad leader, especially in the long run. An optimized shared leadership role is best suited for someone who only takes up the role when the team or situation demands, and defers or delegates roles and responsibilities to others based on merit.

A true leader is humble and lets other people take up the mantle without judgement.

  • Shared leadership increases the diversity of thought and creates synergy, proving that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.
  • It also increases awareness for backup behaviour and primary/secondary accountability.
  • It can be a high-maintenance system, requiring structure, communication and coordination. It requires more energy and maybe overkill for simple tasks.
Shared Leadership Vs Teamwork

Teams are effective due to various processes like psychological safety, constructive conflict and sharing of information.

While teamwork is definitely better with the presence of such processes, the importance of shared leadership in team members is often overlooked.

To be a leader, one has to be self-aware and also be aware of others work-related skills, strengths and weaknesses.

One has to be clear on what skills the team has, which requires a good grip on each team member's role preference.

Jill Konrath

"I got lucky because I never gave up the search. Are you quitting too soon? Or, are you willing to pursue luck with a vengeance?"

Martin Luther King Jr.

"If you can't fly then run. If you can't run, then walk. If you can't walk, then crawl, but whatever you do, you have to keep moving forward."

Tim Ferriss

"The stars will never align, and the traffic lights of life will never all be green at the same time. The universe doesn't conspire against you, but it doesn't go out of its way to line up the pins either. Conditions are never perfect. 'Someday' is a disease that will take your dreams to the grave with you. Pro and con lists are just as bad. If it's important to you and you want to do it 'eventually,' just do it and correct course along the way."

Charles Darwin

"It is not the strongest species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the most responsive to change."

Jack Dorsey

"Make every detail perfect, and limit the number of details to perfect."

Walter Disney

"If you can dream it, you can do it."

Oprah Winfrey

"Step out of the history that is holding you back. Step into the new story you are willing to create."

Larry Ellison

"When you innovate, you’ve got to be prepared for people telling you that you are nuts."

Irene Rosenfeld

"I talk a lot about taking risks, and then I follow that up very quickly by saying, ‘Take prudent risks."

Lakshmi Mittal

"Always think outside the box and embrace opportunities that appear, wherever they might be."

Dave Thomas

"What do you need to start a business? Three simple things: know your product better than anyone, know your customer, and have a burning desire to succeed."

Michael Dell

"You don’t need to be a genius or a visionary, or even a college graduate for that matter, to be successful. You just need a framework and a dream."

Daniel Pink

"Human beings have an innate inner drive to be autonomous, self-determined and connected to one another. And, when that drive is liberated, people achieve more and live richer lives."

Eleanor Roosevelt

"You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along. You must do the thing you think you cannot do."

Mark Cuban

"It doesn’t matter how many times you fail. It doesn’t matter how many times you almost get it right. No one is going to know or care about your failures, and neither should you. All you have to do is learn from them and those around you because all that matters in business is that you get it right once. Then everyone can tell you how lucky you are."

Golda Meir

"Make the most of yourself by fanning the tiny, inner sparks of possibility into flames of achievement"

David Brinkley

"A successful man is one who can lay a firm foundation with the bricks others have thrown at him."

Socrates

"The secret of change is to focus all your energy not on fighting the old but on building the new."

Thomas Edison

"Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time."

Marissa Mayer

"If you can push through that feeling of being scared, that feeling of taking a risk, really amazing things can happen."

Fully autonomous cars

Elon Musk thinks his company Tesla will have fully autonomous cars available by the end of 2020.

However, there are some fundamental challenges to the safe introduction of these cars before they can be on our roads.

Social acceptability is an issue for those wishing to buy a self-driving car and others who will share the road as numerous automated and autonomous vehicles have been in high-profile accidents.

There is a risk of rejection of this technology if the public is not considered in the decisions about the introduction and adoption of self-driving vehicles. Without collaboration on how to make the car safe and provide evidence of that safety, this project will not gain traction.

Autonomous cars use several sensors to detect objects such as pedestrians, other vehicles, and road signs.

However, bad weather, heavy traffic, road signs with graffiti on them all interfere with the accuracy of its sensing capability. To enable true autonomous cars, these sensors have to work in all weather conditions anywhere on the planet.

Without recognized regulations and standards, self-driving cars will not be allowed on the road.

Currently, there are no sufficient standards and regulations for a whole autonomous system. The criteria for the safety of existing vehicles assume the presence of a human driver to take over.

Once an autonomous car is on the road, it will continue to learn. It will detect new objects and be subject to software updates.

The system should continue to be just as safe as its previous version and not forget previously learned behaviors. It should be able to show that any new learning is safe. The industry still has to reach an agreement on these points.

Currently, there is no widely accepted and agreed basis for ensuring that the machine learning algorithms used in the vehicles are safe.

Autonomous vehicles will use artificial intelligence and machine learning to process the data collected from its sensors to help make decisions about their next actions. The algorithms will help identify the objects detected by the sensors and classify them according to the system's training.

Global crises are always challenging to navigate. When the time for immediate response passes, we have to dig in for the long haul.

Factors that influence operations going forward will be unique to each company. Remote work may continue to play a bigger role than it did before the pandemic. The emphasis is more on employees' mental health and well-being.

An employee-driven approach lets you change policies and practices in a way that is informed by data and not a gut feeling.

You may never get a holistic understanding of your company's health unless you have a conversation with your employees. They will know how you cared for them and made them feel. In turn, that will inform how engaged they are in the long run.

  • Part of the response is to hold performance and growth check-ins to acknowledge the contribution each employee is making and help them manage their longer-term professional goals.
  • Err on the side of overcommunicating. Create a communication plan and be consistent. E.g., a daily email from the heads of each unit, or video messages from the CEO. Share even the bad news, to prevent employees from inventing their own stories to fill the void.
  • Keep a tight feedback loop. Know how your employees are coping, how their work is affected, and how they think leadership can help.
  • Be mindful of the resources you're consuming. Don't consume additional masks, disinfectants, and other supplies that hospitals need.

Be proactive in asking employees how they're doing and what's holding them back. That way, you will know you're responding in the right way at the right time.

  • If you don't have information from staff, start with a comprehensive survey. Find out if they have an appropriate workspace and reliable internet access at home.
  • Do they also care for children? Parent? These can have a psychological impact.
  • Inquire about their emotional state. Do they feel connected to their team? Are they lonely at home?
  • Try to get a view of their ability to collaborate with teammates effectively. Video calls and virtual whiteboards may be a steep learning curve.

Employees' health and well-being should come first. There may be a perceived choice between productivity and well-being. But, engagement is a natural by-product of well-being.

People are worried about health, job security, their kids' education, life on the other side of the crisis. Micro-managing will not create focus. Tactics like time-tracking software will only compound the problem. Instead, focus on easing their fears. The more distractions we as leaders can clear away, the more effective our people will be.

In countries that emphasize the needs of the group over the individual, like Asian and Latin American countries, inconsistent behavior is not immediately associated with hypocrisy.

In collectivistic cultures, people will prioritize the preservation of relationships, even when people have double standards.

A reason leaders behave inconsistently is a phenomenon called 'moral licensing.' When people do or say something virtuous, they seem to feel licensed to act in ways that might otherwise call their virtue into question.

Leaders working extremely hard for the common good, might psychologically collect moral credits. This makes them likely to judge their own behavior more kindly than they would do otherwise, even if it may be unethical. They may also convince themselves that others will see their actions in the same light.

The simplest reason leaders are inconsistent is that they think they can get away with it. Although that may be true in some cases, most people like to see themselves as virtuous.

Another reason for demanding one thing and doing another is to please different audiences. It may feel like leaders are doing the right thing in two different contexts.

Following the rules

If there is one group of people you expect to set an example and follow the rules, it would be the people issuing them. In New Zealand, the health minister Dr. David Clark was demoted after he broke national lockdown rules in order to take his family to the beach.

When leaders act hypocritically, they undermine their own positions.

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