Euthyphro - Deepstash
Euthyphro

Kyo 's Key Ideas from Euthyphro
by Plato

Ideas, facts & insights covering these topics:

9 ideas

·

1.27K reads

7

Explore the World's Best Ideas

Join today and uncover 100+ curated journeys from 50+ topics. Unlock access to our mobile app with extensive features.

Unexpected Encounter

Unexpected Encounter

Socrates and Euthyphro cross paths outside the Athenian court. Socrates faces charges of corrupting the youth and impiety, for not adhering the city's religious beliefs and introducing unconventional divine figures. Euthyphro is present to prosecute his own father for the alleged murder of a servant who had killed another slave. Despite the widely held belief that it is impious to accuse one's father, Euthyphro asserts that his action is justified driven by his understanding of religious duty and the need to purify his household of bloodguilt—a concept that challenge traditional Athenian norm.

24

211 reads

Piety

Piety

The Greek term "hosion," translated as piety or the pious, encompasses both religious correctness and moral righteousness. Euthyphro initially defines piety narrowly as the correct performance of religious rituals and practices, including the prosecution of wrongdoers. In contrast, Socrates, known for his philosophical inquiries, expands the discussion to consider piety as a broader concept related to moral virtue and righteous living.

24

168 reads

In their dialogue, Socrates playfully engages Euthyphro, sarcastically expressing delight in meeting someone knowledgeable about piety, a subject crucial to his impending trial. He prompts Euthyphro to define piety, to which Euthyphro offers five successive definitions, each refuted by Socrates' critical analysis.

24

146 reads

First Definition

First Definition

Euthyphro initially suggests that piety is synonymous with his act of prosecuting wrongdoers, such as his father.

However, Socrates counters that this is merely an example of piety, not a comprehensive definition.

24

155 reads

Second Definition

Second Definition

Euthyphro then proposes that piety consists of actions loved by the gods, with impiety being what the gods detest.

Socrates challenges this by pointing out that different gods may have conflicting preferences, rendering this definition problematic.

24

142 reads

Third Definition

Third Definition

Seeking to refine his definition, Euthyphro asserts that piety is what all the gods love universally, and impiety is what they collectively despise.

Socrates, in turn, queries whether actions are pious because the gods love them or if the gods love them because they are inherently pious — a crucial distinction Euthyphro struggles to clarify.

(This is where the famous Euthyphro dillema came from).

26

125 reads

Fourth Definition

Fourth Definition

Further attempting to define piety, Euthyphro suggests it involves caring for the gods' well-being or interests.

Socrates questions the nature of this care, highlighting its ambiguity and the difficulty in defining it in practical terms, akin to the care one might provide a pet or master.

It can't be the sort of care a dog owner gives to its dog since that aims at improving the dog. But we can't improve the gods. If it's like the care an enslaved person gives his enslaver, it must aim at some definite shared goal. But Euthyphro can't say what that goal is.

24

109 reads

Fifth Definition

Fifth Definition

Lastly, Euthyphro defines piety as doing and saying what pleases the gods during prayers and sacrifices.

However, under Socrates' scrutiny, this definition circles back to the previous definition (3rd definition in disguise), where the essence of piety remains elusive.

24

102 reads

Ending

Ending

Ultimately, Euthyphro, unable to provide a satisfactory definition that withstands Socrates' relentless questioning, abruptly concludes their dialogue, suggesting he has other engagements to attend to.

24

118 reads

IDEAS CURATED BY

kyoie99

Just doin Philosophy

CURATOR'S NOTE

Full summary of Euthyphro by Plato

Discover Key Ideas from Books on Similar Topics

Apology

12 ideas

Apology

By Plato

The Republic

7 ideas

Crito

12 ideas

Crito

Plato

Read & Learn

20x Faster

without
deepstash

with
deepstash

with

deepstash

Personalized microlearning

100+ Learning Journeys

Access to 200,000+ ideas

Access to the mobile app

Unlimited idea saving

Unlimited history

Unlimited listening to ideas

Downloading & offline access

Supercharge your mind with one idea per day

Enter your email and spend 1 minute every day to learn something new.

Email

I agree to receive email updates