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Mathematicians have solved traffic jams, and they're begging cities to listen

https://www.fastcompany.com/90455739/mathematicians-have-solved-traffic-jams-and-theyre-begging-cities-to-listen

fastcompany.com

Mathematicians have solved traffic jams, and they're begging cities to listen
Most traffic jams are unnecessary, and this deeply irks mathematicians who specialize in traffic flow. They reserve particular vitriol for local transport engineers. "They do not have competencies in the field of system-related increases in traffic performance," says Alexander Krylatov, a mathematics professor at St. Petersburg University.

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Traffic jams 

Most traffic jams are unnecessary. Local transport engineers manage to achieve local improvements, but after a while the flows rearrange, and the same traffic jams appear elsewhere.

Mathematicians who specialize in traffic flow would like to solve urban traffic jams forever.

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Math approaches to traffic

  • All drivers need to be on the same navigation system. Cars can only be efficiently rerouted if instructions come from the same hub. 
  • Many urban roads are too narrow. Traffic-flow models can indicate where parking spots should be turned into lanes.
  • Green lanes incentive. For cities that want to increase electric car use, special lanes should be created for electric cars.
  • Digital twins. Digital modeling can create an entire “twin” of existing roadways to assist transport engineers.

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