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Memory Cues: How to Set Yourself Up to Remember

Different types of memory cues

  • Internal memory cues are patterns of thinking that help trigger a specific memory. For example, mental imagery, which involves visualizing a certain scene happening, can serve as an internal reminder of an event that happened.
  • External memory cues are objects or events that trigger a memory that they are associated with. For example, a glass of water next to your bed is an external reminder to drink water when you wake up.

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Memory Cues: How to Set Yourself Up to Remember

Memory Cues: How to Set Yourself Up to Remember

https://effectiviology.com/external-memory-cues/

effectiviology.com

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Key Ideas

Memory cues

They are objects or events that help trigger an action or a memory of that action. 

They can be either intentional (a reminder on our phone) or unintentional (seeing a product at the store which reminds us of something that we forgot to add to our shopping list.)

Different types of memory cues

  • Internal memory cues are patterns of thinking that help trigger a specific memory. For example, mental imagery, which involves visualizing a certain scene happening, can serve as an internal reminder of an event that happened.
  • External memory cues are objects or events that trigger a memory that they are associated with. For example, a glass of water next to your bed is an external reminder to drink water when you wake up.

Example of exernal cues

  • To remember to floss your teeth, put the box with the floss on top of your tube of toothpaste.
  • To remember to take a pill each morning, put the pills next to whatever you usually eat for breakfast.
  • To start the day by writing, put a piece of paper with a reminder on top of your keyboard.
  • You can use your watch as a reminder to take things easy, so that every time you look at it you remember to relax a little.

Implementing memory cues

  • You can set up certain things that will serve as cues. You intentionally set up a certain item or event which will appear at an appropriate time and serve as a reminder. 
  • You can also decide that something which occurs naturally will serve as a cue. You intentionally take advantage of something that you encounter naturally or which occurs naturally in your everyday life, and use it as a reminder for something that you need to do.

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