Forget about the Big Bad Blue Light myth - Deepstash

Forget about the Big Bad Blue Light myth

It's a story told by the blue-light-blocking glasses sellers that doesn't rely on hard evidence.

And no, looking at screens will probably not make you go blind either.

The only real issue here is eyestrain, which can happen in all kinds of situations, starting with driving.

Easy hack to avoid that :

"Every 20 minutes, take a 20-second break to look at something 20 feet away."

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Keep your innovation muscles strong
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Two of the biggest innovations

Two of the biggest innovations of modern times are cars and airplanes. At first, every new invention looks like a toy. It takes decades for people to realise the potential of it.

  • Adolphus Greely, a brigadier general, was one of the first people outside the car industry to consider the usefulness of a "horseless carriage." He bought three cars in 1899 for the U.S. Army to experiment with. It was envisioned to be used as transportation of light artillery such as machine guns, to carry equipment, ammunition, and supplies.
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