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5 Productivity Myths Debunked by Science - Art Of Productivity

Myth #2: Early Birds Get The Worm

Myth #2: Early Birds Get The Worm

Creative insights may come during “non-optimal” times of the day. Society might be structured for early risers but you should stick to working during times when you’re at your most productive (as much as possible).

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5 Productivity Myths Debunked by Science - Art Of Productivity

5 Productivity Myths Debunked by Science - Art Of Productivity

http://artofproductivity.com/5-productivity-myths-debunked-by-science/

artofproductivity.com

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Key Ideas

Myth #5: You Should Never Work At Home

Some people working from home have a higher efficiency on time spent working and performance per minute. The employees surveyed also reported they were happier working at home. 

Myth #4: Pushing To Get Things Done

Willpower is a limited resource, one that we deplete through hard, focused work. We need to take regular breaks to restore our flagging willpower and keep our productivity in the long run.

Take a break and do something different for a few minutes every half-hour or so to give your brain a break and replenish your mental resources. 

Myth #3: The Internet Is A Distraction

The Internet distracts but we use it for researching items and retaining information. If you build up your searching skills and ignore distractions, like social networks, it becomes just a tool.

Myth #2: Early Birds Get The Worm

Creative insights may come during “non-optimal” times of the day. Society might be structured for early risers but you should stick to working during times when you’re at your most productive (as much as possible).

Myth #1: Multitasking Makes You Efficient

While multitasking your brain needs to do goal shifting and rule activation (turning off rules for one task and turning on rules for another).

Switching tasks always carries a cost in terms of time and mental energy. And although the cost in time is short we switch so often that it stacks up and can consume up to 40% of your time.

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Not respecting your calendar

Treat the meeting with yourself as it was a meeting with a third party. It’s only you who can act on your most important tasks with priority.

Make sure that you set up boundaries for yourself and for other people. Remember to communicate with them clearly.

Such a boundary can be that you leave your office at a certain time each day because your family is your priority. It doesn’t mean, of course, that you can’t work later in periods of high workload.

Multitasking

Ringing phones, text messages, reminders, pop-ups, social media, email.

There’re countless studies demonstrating that multitasking will hinder your work both in terms of quality and quantity. 

Resist the temptation to get in the loop and do one thing at a time.

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Your Body is a Clock

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Early Bird or Night Owls

The body is an orchestra of organs, each providing an essential function. In this metaphor, the circadian rhythm is the conductor. The conductor makes every neurotransmitter, every hormone, and every chemical in the body cycle with the daily rhythm.

This makes us our sleep habits unique and tailored.

Sleep Habits

Being a morning (or evening) person is inborn, genetic, and very hard to change.

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If you find it difficult to see what time of day your mind is functioning best, keep a productivity log. At two-hour intervals, write down your physical and mental status. You'll find a pattern of peak performance or sluggishness.

Multitasking is a myth

Most people have little pockets of time throughout the day, between meetings and calls and emails, with 15 minutes here, and 30 minutes there. To perform at your best depends on simple time management hacks.

  • Set aside one or two times a day to check and respond to all your messages and emails, then close your inbox.
  • Try and structure your day in one-to two-hour chunks of focused work.
  • Introduce a clear protocol for colleagues to contact one another in case of an actual emergency.

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