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Science-backed methods to keep in mind when you're learning new things

Set an ending time for tasks

Parkinson’s second law: Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion.

Setting a micro deadline for daily tasks holds your brain accountable to the tick of the clock.

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Science-backed methods to keep in mind when you're learning new things

Science-backed methods to keep in mind when you're learning new things

https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/science-backed-methods-to-keep-in-mind-when-youre-learning-new-things-34c00b35cbf/

freecodecamp.org

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Key Ideas

Just start, break the initial barrier

Every task has a certain Activation Energy (AE), where you initiate certain steps in order to start a task.

Reducing the Activation Energy of new habits you want to form will make it is easier to get started.

If you want to exercise, have your shoes and weights ready the previous night.

Practice chunking

A memory chunk is a solid connection in your mind that relates various bits and pieces of information. 

Focus on the concept you want to form a chunk of. Write down the basic ideas of what the concept is all about. Build up from these fundamentals to finally create a chunk.

Learn, Practice, Recall — Repeat

Just forming chunks is not sufficient. You have to maintain them. The more you look after the chunks, the longer they last.

While reviewing material, recall it instead of just reading it passively. Try and recall in a different setting than where you studied it.

Take it easy

Whenever you face a problem, take a break. Sleep. Clean your room. Do anything except work on the problem. 

This takes your brain into its “diffuse mode” — this mode works on the things you have been focusing on in the background. Come back to the problem later.

Understand your procrastination

A procrastinator is a person who has a HABIT of getting distracted by things.

Break this habit by eliminating distractions. Another option is the Cue-Routine where you take notice what you do in response to certain distracting cues ,and then make sure to resist it.

Set an ending time for tasks

Parkinson’s second law: Work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion.

Setting a micro deadline for daily tasks holds your brain accountable to the tick of the clock.

Use visual and spatial memories

The #1 thing you need to do to correctly memorize concepts is understand them. To successfully understand something, visualizing it is key. 

Use metaphors and stories

Metaphors will help you understand and recall more easily. 

You take something obvious from your memory, and see how it is related to the new concept you are trying to learn. 

Learn what you want

People learn when they are self-motivated, not when someone comes in front of them for four hours a week, and tells something to them.

Start learning what you want, since that is what actually matters — that is what you must care about.

Intersection of skills

Transfer learning is the ability to take what you learn in one domain and apply it to a new skill.

Learn to apply old skills to new skills and vice versa.

Sleep

Lack of sleep affects memory and recall. 

Sleep helps your brain get into the diffuse mode and thus gets creative ideas about your ongoing projects cooking.

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Chunking
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Beware of Illusions of Competence
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Instead of highlighting or underlining, rather take brief notes that summarize keys concepts.

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