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5 Science-Backed Ways Taking A Break Boosts Our Productivity

Taking a break once an hour

... increases productivity. Recent studies show that those who give in to some kind of diversion or distraction once an hour perform better than those who just keep at it without a break. 

Taking a break allows us to come back to the job at hand with renewed energy and sense of purpose.

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5 Science-Backed Ways Taking A Break Boosts Our Productivity

5 Science-Backed Ways Taking A Break Boosts Our Productivity

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/5-science-backed-ways-taking-a-break-boosts-our-productivity_b_8548292

huffpost.com

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Key Ideas

A break can serve as creative fuel

Something as simple as a ten-minute conversation with a friend, or watching an inspiring video can give us a much needed boost, or point us in a new direction if we've been stuck. 

Talking a step away -- literally or figuratively -- might be just what we need to recharge.

Physical movement

We are not designed to sit around all day. 

Getting up for a few minutes and getting our blood flowing and some more oxygen to the brain is a necessary piece of the work day.

Take a tea break

An afternoon tea break gives us more than a caffeine boost.

The process of making and drinking a cup of tea makes us slow down and gives us time for a much needed pause.

Exercise

Playing hard helps us with working hard.
If you know you typically have an afternoon energy slump, consider a lunchtime workout.
Studies have shown that a moderate level of cardio activity can boost creativity and productivity for two hours afterwards. 

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Recharging your energy
Just as you need to refuel your car and recharge the batteries in your cell phone, it’s important to give yourself the chance to recoup your energy levels throughout the workday.
Fully switch off

We're usually tempted to spend breaks doing things that are convenient but aren’t truly restful (internet shopping, browsing the latest news, etc.) 

But brief work breaks are only genuinely rejuvenating when they give you the chance to fully switch off. Any kind of activity that involves willpower or concentration, even if it’s not in a work context, is only going to add to your fatigue levels.

Take short breaks early and often

The timing of our breaks makes a difference.

Although it may be tempting to wait until we’re flagging later in the day before allowing ourselves a short break, we actually respond better to breaks in the morning - it seems we need to have some fuel in the tank to benefit from a re-fill.

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Myth #5: You Should Never Work At Home
Myth #5: You Should Never Work At Home

Some people working from home have a higher efficiency on time spent working and performance per minute. The employees surveyed also reported they were happier working at home. 

Myth #4: Pushing To Get Things Done

Willpower is a limited resource, one that we deplete through hard, focused work. We need to take regular breaks to restore our flagging willpower and keep our productivity in the long run.

Take a break and do something different for a few minutes every half-hour or so to give your brain a break and replenish your mental resources. 

Myth #3: The Internet Is A Distraction

The Internet distracts but we use it for researching items and retaining information. If you build up your searching skills and ignore distractions, like social networks, it becomes just a tool.

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Outside the comfort of daily routines

We all have increased metal stress since we are rethinking all of our routines during the current pandemic.
All of us have an increased mental load due to the uncertainty, sometimes around thing...

Sleep more

Sleep has a positive impact on your mental, physical, and emotional health.
If you don't sleep well during the night, give yourself permission to take a nap during the day. Naps of 10-20 minutes can boost alertness without creating the post-sleep brain fog of longer naps.

Mini breaks throughout the day 

Plan and schedule breaks into your daily schedule.
Let your brain know that within a relatively short amount of time, you will have a clear break to check social media, walk around, respond to texts, or do whatever nonwork habit you want.

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