Mind Mapping - Deepstash

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The Power of Mind Maps to Build Your Career Master Plan | Prolific Living

Mind Mapping

Mind maps are the best way to visually and textually organize your ideas, projects, thoughts, and tasks in a way that gives you a structure and sensibly links related concepts.

  • Mind maps have many levels. Some calls these branches, as in a tree. 
  • In the center, you have the root – the core concept, and then from that center, you branch out. 
  • Your first level of branches is your key core branches, the thick ones that you first notice when you look at a tree. 
  • You can then go on to create second and third levels to your branches.

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Leverage Your Competitive Advantage

Career plans should leverage your assets, set you in direction of your aspirations, and account for the market realities.

  • Articulate educated hypotheses about each. “I believe I am skilled at X, I believe I want to do Y, I believe the market needs Z.” 
  • These hypotheses should lead you to specific actions even though you may have broad aspirations, like “help interesting people do interesting things” or “design human ecosystems.” 
Prioritize Learning

A person with a foundation of knowledge and skills will make more money and most likely live a more meaningful life.
There’s a similar belief in start-ups: technology companies focus on learning over profitability in the early years to maximize revenue in the later years.

Prioritize plans that offer the best chance at learning about yourself and the world. Ask yourself, “Which plan offers the most learning potential?”

Learn by Doing

Any entrepreneur (and any expert on cognition / learning) will tell you that practical knowledge is best developed by doing, not just thinking or planning.

For careers, too, you don’t know what the best plan is until you try. 

Identify issues

Determine where you are in your career. 

Identify how you got there and why you might lack fulfillment in your professional life.

Establish the core values

These are the non-negotiable values you want to be known and remembered for.

Once you have identified your values, look at your personality, skills and interests to make sure that they align with your current occupation.

Ask the big questions

These are questions like “What do I really want?” or “Should I change careers?

The more grounded you are with the answers to these important questions, the better able you are to reach your true goals.

The Outline/List

Is a linear method of taking notes that proceeds down the page, using indentation or bullets to denote major and minor points.

Pros: it records content relationship in a way that is easy to review.

Cons: difficult to go back and edit information written in this system.

Works for: recording terms, definitions, facts and sequences, when taking notes on slides or readings.

The Sentence Method

The goal is to jot down your thoughts as quickly as possible. Format is kept to a minimum: every new thought is written on a new line. 

Pros: Is like free writing for notes.

Cons: lack organization and notes can be hard to understand.

Works for: meetings or lectures that lack organization; when information is presented very quickly.

SQ3R (Survey, Question, Read, Recite, Review)
  • Skim the material for bolded text, images, summaries, to produce a list of headlines;
  • Each headline is then written in the form of a question;
  • Record your “answers” to the reading questions under each corresponding header;
  • Once you’ve finished reading the text, write a summary of the material from memory—this is the “recite” part of the process. 
  • Finally, review your notes to make sure you’ve completely grasped the concepts.

Works for: dense written material.