4. “3 Before Me” - Deepstash

4. “3 Before Me”

Let’s say your students have gone through the Problem Solving Process, revisited past problems, and documented what doesn’t work. Now, they know it’s time to ask someone for help. Great! But before you jump into save the day, practice “3 Before Me”. This means students need to ask 3 other classmates their question before asking the teacher. By doing this, students practice helpful 21st century skills like collaboration and communication, and can usually find the info they’re looking for on the way.

3

STASHED IN:

40

MORE IDEAS FROM Developing Problem-Solving Skills for Kids | Strategies & Tips | Kodable Blog

Sometimes finding the answer to a problem requires the process of elimination. Have your students attempt to solve a problem at least two different ways before reaching out to you for help. Even better, encourage them write down their “Not-The-Answers” so you can see their thought process when you do step in to support. Cool thing is, you likely won’t need to! By attempting to solve a problem in multiple different ways, students will often come across the answer on their own.

4

STASHED IN:

40

1. Go Step-By-Step Through The Problem-Solving Sequence

Post problem-solving anchor charts and references on your classroom wall or pin them to your Google Classroom – anything to make them accessible to students. When they ask for help, invite them to reference the charts first.

7

STASHED IN:

42

Picture this: You’ve carefully created an assignment for your class. The step-by-step instructions are crystal clear. During class time, you walk through all the directions, and the response is awesome. Your students are ready! It’s finally time for them to start working individually and then… 8 hands shoot up with questions. You hear one student mumble in the distance, “Wait, I don’t get this” followed by the dreaded, “What are we supposed to be doing again?”

3

STASHED IN:

38

1. Go Step-By-Step Through The Problem-Solving Sequence

Post problem-solving anchor charts and references on your classroom wall or pin them to your Google Classroom – anything to make them accessible to students. When they ask for help, invite them to reference the charts first.

4

STASHED IN:

37

If a student gets stuck, they should ask themself, “Have I ever seen a problem like this before? If so, how did I solve it?” Chances are, your students have tackled something similar already and can recycle the same strategies they used before to solve the problem this time around.

6

STASHED IN:

41

Deepstash helps you become inspired, wiser and productive, through bite-sized ideas from the best articles, books and videos out there.

GET THE APP:

RELATED IDEA

This means that if you engage in ballet or another form of structured dance, doing so mayfacilitate convergent thinking . In other words, it may help you find a single, appropriate answer to a problem. If you need help with divergent thinking (finding multiple answers to a problem), engaging in more improvised types of dance such as hip-hop or tap might just do the trick.

4

STASHED IN:

78

Creating parent-teacher groups enables parents to share their opinion in regards to topics that concern directly their children, such as classroom activities, field trips, or homework. 

This can prove extremely efficient, as parents are the ones who know the best their kids and can, therefore, make great decisions when it comes to them.

STASHED IN:

50

7 Steps To Become An Effective Problem Solver

Effective problem solving is one of the key attributes that separate great leaders from average ones.But that doesn't mean that average ones couldn't become great leaders.If you follow the following simple steps correctly, of course you can also become a great leader in many aspects.

  1. Identify the problem
  2. Analyze the problem
  3. Describe the problem
  4. Look for root causes
  5. Develop alternate solutions
  6. Implement the final solution
  7. Measure the results

34

STASHED IN:

59