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10 Ways to Overcome Fear of Missing Out

Practice discernment

... in regard to distinguishing what is truly important and necessary from what is merely desirable.

Focus on the kinds of things that enhance the quality not the quantity of your experiences.


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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

10 Ways to Overcome Fear of Missing Out

10 Ways to Overcome Fear of Missing Out

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/stronger-the-broken-places/201501/10-ways-overcome-fear-missing-out

psychologytoday.com

10

Key Ideas

Slow down

Practice taking your time when eating, driving, talking, or engaging in the tasks of everyday living. 

Practice discernment

... in regard to distinguishing what is truly important and necessary from what is merely desirable.

Focus on the kinds of things that enhance the quality not the quantity of your experiences.


Go for the experience, not the symbol

There are always going to be people we admire and perhaps envy. It’s “the grass is greener on the other side” syndrome.

Focusing on the experience—a feeling of accomplishment, adventure, connection, fun, self-respect, freedom—that underlies the object or symbol—wealth, marriage, a sports car, a luxurious home—helps us distinguish what is truly fulfilling from that which can only provide a temporary feeling of pleasure.

Be willing to not have it all

Needs are limited. Desires are endless. Accepting the essential futility of trying to fulfill every desire we have is much wiser than indulging all of our impulses for gratification. 

Decide what your highest priorities are and focus on them and cut off other options.

One thing at a time

Psychiatrist Edward M. Hallowell describes multitasking as a “mythical activity in which people believe they can perform two or more tasks simultaneously as effectively as one.” 

When people attempt to apply themselves to too many tasks at a time, they are usually unsuccessful. When they are focused on a single task, and give their full attention to it, not only are they more likely to be successful in producing a high quality result, but their level of satisfaction while performing the task is much higher.

Practice Mindfulness

Rather than desperately seeking rock star recognition, cultivate the mastery of enjoying mundane pleasures. 

Prioritize relationships

Invest time and energy in relationships and cultivate the skills that they require.

This may be one of the best things that we can do to bring higher levels of fulfillment into our lives, which is a wonderful antidote to the compulsive activity that characterizes FOMO.

Savor the moment

Take time to linger over pleasurable experiences rather than rushing through them in quest of the next thrill. Really smell the coffee (and the roses and the other delightful scents that you encounter). 

Cultivate an attitude of gratitude

FOMO is fear of not having something that is necessary for our well being. 

Gratitude allows us to count the blessings in our life right now, in this moment, where life is actually going on.

Enjoy the process

Let yourself take pleasure in the the heightened level of relaxation and ease that comes into your life as you gift yourself with these experiences. It’s not just you—everyone in your life that benefits from losing FOMO!

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

FOMO Comes From Unhappiness

You’re not feeling so great — whether you realize it or not — and you turn to social media to make you feel better. Only one problem there: it actually makes you feel worse…

The Facebook Illusion

We all know that Facebook doesn’t provide a very well-rounded picture of people’s lives. It’s more like the cherry-picked perfection version.

People with FOMO have ambivalent feelings toward Facebook. It brings them up when they post about their own carefully edited version of life awesomeness, and slams them back down when they feel they have to compete with other people's lifestyle awesomeness - especially when they're feeling a little down or anxious themselves.

The Problem Is Attention

Looking at social media for happiness is a bad idea. You won’t find it out there. Your happiness is determined by how you allocate your attention. What you attend to drives your behavior and it determines your happiness. 

Changing behavior and enhancing happiness is as much about withdrawing attention from the negative as it is about attending to the positive.

one more idea

The fear of missing out (FOMO)
FOMO = the compulsive desire to experience something (or be somewhere) motivated by the fear of what you will potentially lose. And this idea of loss is usually imagined. FOMO is that i...
FOMO and the quality of our experiences
FOMO make us want to accumulate as many experiences as possible, but at the same time, it robs those experiences of any real meaning. That's because it causes people to make their decisions based not on the reality of the experience, but rather the imagined experience. 
Overcoming FOMO
The way to get out of feeling FOMO is to start killing those fantasies that you’re letting rule your decision making. And that means understanding there’s no such thing as a perfect night out or a perfect party. 
FOMO (Fear of Missing Out)

FOMO is the experience of worrying that other people are doing more interesting things than you, have more friends than you, and are just all around living a better and cooler life.

Th...

What you really wish to do

Choosing one path means missing another.

When you feel FOMO coming on, ask yourself if the trigger is really something you wish you were doing yourself, or if the sudden recollection of the great number of choices in life has simply brought on a moment of insecurity about your own

If it’s the latter, taking a moment to reaffirm your decision is all it takes to chase the FOMO away.

The need for a change

Keep in mind that your FOMO trigger may not relate directly to something you wish you were doing yourself, but can instead point more broadly to something you want to change about your life.

Examine the source of your FOMO before dismissing it; there may be a good reason you feel insecure about your decisions.

3 more ideas

The "Fear" in FOMO

Living with constant or recurring fear, from post-traumatic stress to paranoia to FOMO, doesn’t improve life quality; it just makes us haunted and tense.

Our task is to live in a FOMO-plag...

FOMO is based on lies

When you feel FOMO coming on, remind yourself that practically every image you see on practically any screen is likely misleading. 

The human experience depicted by the media is never the whole truth — and often an outright lie. 

Fight FOMO with FOMO

What if we let FOMO mean something else? 

  • Fear of Moving On. With this definition, you remind yourself that fixating on things you may be missing is just another way of resisting your own life, your own unfolding destiny.
  • Find One Magnificent Object. When FOMO strikes, let it prompt you to contemplate something wonderful: the sun, a bowl of soup, your own hand.
  • Feel Okay More Often. Realize that simple equanimity, along with the enjoyment of small things, is the healthy diet that yields sustainable happiness.

Try inventing your own FOMO definition. 

one more idea

FOMO Meaning
The “fear of missing out” refers to the feeling of “anxiety that an exciting or interesting event may currently be happening elsewhere.”

Most people at one time or another have been preoccupi...

Relish feeling out of the loop
Admit that you are missing out and there’s nothing you can do about it. 

Blogger and entrepreneur Anil Dash wrote about the “Joy of Missing Out,” a term he coined to describe the satisfaction of doing things on his own terms. 

Refrain from social media
Try staying offline for a day, a week, or maybe even a month to wake up to the wonders of the real world. 

If you return, decide which sites to spent time on and which not.

3 more ideas

Prepare for rejection

Always have a rejection-processing protocol in place. Debrief with personal and professional support people who can empathize and appreciate your experiences without passing judgment, criticizing o...

Find the blessings in rejection

In many cases, rejections are blessings in disguise. Maybe you don't want those customers that rejected your product.

Refer and direct those customers to your competitors that fit their needs. They certainly would not forget the lengths you went to. Such service is rare.

Feed your growth mindset

You might initially doubt yourself, question your competency and your self-worth but after you have weathered the storm, activate your growth mindset and start asking questions: 

What can I do differently? What have I discovered about myself? What changes can I make? What will I do differently next time? 

one more idea

Manipulate your thoughts

It doesn’t work to say to yourself, “I have to stop being afraid.”

  1. If you notice yourself having a thought that undermines your attempts at bravery, simply label it as such
Consider that your fear isn’t legitimate

Legitimate fear tends to make us want to get the heck out of whatever situation we are in.

Not-helpful fear makes us hesitate rather than bolt.

We are afraid of looking stupid, and so we don’t ask a burning question. We fear failing, and so we don’t even try. 

The "If X, Then Y” plan
  • IF my team grumbles or pushes-back because I’m not working on the weekends anymore,
  • THEN I will forward them Leslie Perlow’s Harvard Business Review article about how ‘Predictable Time Off’ improves both work quality
  • AND quality of life, even in client-oriented businesses.

Fear is the thing that in truth makes actions hard, not the action that we think we are afraid of.

Find What Gives Your Work Meaning

Is it a connection to a certain cause? Is it engaging one of your skills or personal passions? Is it serving a specific population? Everyone has their own causes, the things that give their ...

Cultivate Self Awareness

Ask yourself concrete questions to reveal your truth:

What are you working for? What impact do you want to create in your job? What skills do you want to develop and leverage?

Write a Career Mantra

Keep it short and simple—just focus on what gets you out the door every day. 

Your mantra should encompass who you are, where you want to go, and the impact you want to make during your 9-to-5. 

2 more ideas

Alain de Botton

“What registers as anxiety is typically no freakish phenomenon; it is the mind’s logical enraged plea not to be co..."

Alain de Botton
Relationships: quality, not quantity

The many relationships we foster are valuable and enrich our lives. But the pressure we put on ourselves to maintain these relationships can, at times, be damaging. 

When you feel overextended, it’s important to learn to just say no to a dinner out or a weekend work trip.

Get good sleep

When you're feeling unfocused, before trying to make big changes in your life, to fix things, press the reset button and put yourself to bed.

And if you have trouble getting to sleep, try a sleep meditation.

5 more ideas

Positive Thinking
  • Recall positive life events.
  • Help others and remind yourself that you can impact the world and feel happier.
  • Practice mindfulness that makes you more pres...
Creating Purpose

Living a life with meaning and purpose is key to improving your psychological well-being. Your purpose doesn’t necessarily have to involve changing the world or devoting yourself to helping others.

If you lack a purpose, think about the legacy you’d like to leave behind and establish some objectives that can help you reach those goals. 

Psychological Well-Being

it is the combination of feeling good and functioning effectively. People with high psychological well-being report feeling capable, well-supported, and satisfied with life, besides living longer and healthier lives.

Researchers found that the absence of distress doesn’t necessarily correlate with high psychological well-being, but it does with having one’s basic needs met.