Using intuition adaptively - Deepstash

Using intuition adaptively

Whether or not intuition is inherently “good” really depends on the situation. We need to exercise caution and attempt to use intuition adaptively.

  • When we are in situations we have experienced lots of times (such as making judgments about the weather), intuition - or rapid recognition of relevant “cues” – can be a good guide.
  • But if we find ourselves in novel territory or in situations in which valid cues are hard to come by (such as stock market predictions), relying on our “gut” may not be wise.
  • Our inherent tendency to get away with the minimum amount of thinking could lead to slip-ups in our reasoning.

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MORE IDEAS FROM Explainer: what is intuition?

Defining intuition

The word intuition is derived from the Latin intueor – to see; intuition is thus often invoked to explain how the mind can “see” answers to problems or decisions in the absence of explicit reasoning – a “gut reaction”.

But intuition need not refer to some magical process by which answers pop into our minds from thin air or from deep within the unconscious. On the contrary: intuitive decisions are often a product of previous intense

e and/or extensive explicit thinking.

Such decisions may appear subjectively fast and effortless because they are made on the basis of recognition.

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Albert Einstein

“Intuition is nothing but the outcome of earlier intellectual experience.”

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RELATED IDEA

  1. System 1 and System 2: Use fast thinking for routine decisions and slow thinking for important decisions.
  2. Bayesian Thinking: Continuously update the confidence in your beliefs as you come across new information.
  3. First Principles Thinking: If you face a difficult problem, break it down and reassemble it from the ground up.
  4. Occam’s Razor: When there are many possible explanations, assume that the simplest one is probably correct.
  5. Hanlon’s Razor: If someone mistreats you, assume that they probably did it out of neglect rather than malice.

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We’re not nearly as rational as we like to believe. When we face an uncertain situation, we fail to evaluate the information or to look up relevant statistics carefully.
Instead, we depend on our mental shortcuts which may lead us to make rash decisions.

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Psychologists do not understand human moral behavior, because it seldom makes any logical sense.

Using moral philosophy and psychology, biology, economics, mathematics, and computer science, scientists are trying to study how morality operates in the real world.

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