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The 5 Financial Personality Types

The Investor

People who invest are those who love the risk, trade frequently and have enough confidence to think they will beat the market.

A 2011 study found out that most investors underperform, namely 82%, because they were trading instinctively rather than strategically.

Advice: Continue to educate yourself, limit your trades to the amount you could afford to lose and try to act for your long-term financial benefits.

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The 5 Financial Personality Types

The 5 Financial Personality Types

https://riskmagazine.nl/article/2018-10-18-the-5-financial-personality-types

riskmagazine.nl

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Key Ideas

The Investor

People who invest are those who love the risk, trade frequently and have enough confidence to think they will beat the market.

A 2011 study found out that most investors underperform, namely 82%, because they were trading instinctively rather than strategically.

Advice: Continue to educate yourself, limit your trades to the amount you could afford to lose and try to act for your long-term financial benefits.

The Big Spender

The Big Spenders like to make social statements by having the latest car, clothes, or phones. They use the money for love and attention and are the main representatives of consumerism.

Advice: Think twice before making a purchase and try to filter the things that you really need from those bought by reflex.

The Ostrich

The Ostrich is someone who would rather bury their heads in the sand than organize their finances. 

Advice: Ostriches should try to take slowly their heads out of the sand. They should try to examine their finances, take a close look at a better saving rate and consider approaching a financial planner.

The Saver

The Saver hates taking risks and hesitate about investing, or even spending.  

Advice: Cash is not a suitable long-term investment. A financial advisor could help you find the right investment approach and the level of risk you are comfortable with. 

The Debtor

They simply spend too much and don’t put much effort into keeping their financial assets in order.

Advice: Try to keep track of your expenses on a daily basis; check your bank account more often and don’t allow yourself to borrow too much from your friends.

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Financial psychology

 ... is a somewhat overlooked discipline that occupies the space between psychology and behavioral economics. Advertisers and marketers trying to tempt us to spend money are well aware of it.

The Anxious Investor

Lovers of risk, anxious investors trade frequently and believe they have the edge over others. Many have absolutely no idea what their returns actually were and only remember their good decisions.

Despite their overconfidence, they are prone to be beaten by the markets — and frequent trades mean they often rack up high levels of charges.
The Hoarder

For hoarders, money represents security. They abhor risk and may even stockpile cash that they would probably be better off investing — or even spending.

Find an advisor you feel comfortable with who can discuss the right investment approach — and level of risk — for you.

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“The Freedom Finder”

The freedom finders like to spend on new experiences in the pursuit of “living life to the fullest.” 

Try using a budgeting app or immediately allocating a portion of...

“The Relationship Protector”

The relationship protector is often family-oriented. If they can support them emotionally and financially, it gives them their sense of achievement at having helped. 

A relationship protector is far less likely to make spontaneous investments when others depend on them, and their conservative approach to saving prepares them for retirement. 

“The Opportunity Seeker”

They’re always looking to expand their options, and every financial decision is carefully calculated to maximize growth. 

The opportunity seeker has to watch out for taking on more risk with business initiatives or investment opportunities. Spending time with a professional to seek a second opinion can help you assess whether the newest opportunity is the best one for you. 

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Financial Personalities

There are five different types of financial personalities, each of them having their own set of values and outlook towards money:

  • The Big Spenders: The ones who place a high val...
Saving Tips For All Types

After you have figured out your financial personality, here are a few tips to save money:

  • Big Spenders need to consider fun alternatives to the high-purchases with things that cost little but bring real quality and happiness and lead to savings.
  • Savers need to start living their lives, and not live in misery in the present, just for some future security.
  • Shoppers need to recognise the emotions and value in saving money for their future, like a dream home.
  • Debtors need to put some money in automatic saving funds to build their savings.
  • Investors would do great in future, but can also make do with some purchases in the present, striking a balance.
Financial personality
We all spend, save, and invest differently. That’s because we’re all inherently different people with different personalities. 

Knowing your financial personality can help you make a pla...

Frugal Saver

Being a Frugal Saver means all your money is going towards saving.

How you can improve: 

  • Oversaving won’t make you happy. Spend responsibly. 
  • If you’re not saving, you may also not be investing. Investing allows you to grow your money over time.
  • Investing doesn’t have to be all about stocks and bonds, you can invest with just a few cents thanks to apps, or you can invest through Robo-advisors who do nearly all the work for you.
Financial Sage

How you can improve:

  • You’re probably depriving yourself of something, even if that’s just a cup of coffee now and then.
  • If you're concerned about money, try to make more money by getting a side hustle.

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Tony Robbins

It’s not about your resources, it’s about your resourcefulness.”

Tony Robbins
Be Creative To Afford What You Want

By following the conventional path of "school to loan to university to work" you risk running into serious debt. Being creative is a potential way to lessen or eliminate that.

Maybe finding a different and cheaper way of doing the same thing, doing a yard sale or getting a side job… Put your mind to it and you may find ways to get a financial boost. 

The Problem With Mutual Funds

When you buy mutual funds, you are charged a purchase fee upfront. This is a one-time payment to the fund management institution. Annually, you will be charged with a percentage of management fees, commonly known as “expense ratio”, which can be expensive.

Beware when advisors at your bank recommend mutual funds to buy. They might be earning a sales commission.

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Investment explained
Investment explained

An investment is a gamble: instead of the security of guaranteed returns, you're taking a risk with your money. 

You can invest in Shares, Bonds, Funds, Government bonds (gilts), ...

How stock markets work
  • A stock market is simply a place where buyers and sellers meet to sell shares.
  • A share is a divided-up unit of the value of a company.
  • Shares exist to boost profits of firms to turn a business into a financial success.
  • Enter a stock market: in return for your cash, a business offers you a share in its future – so you essentially own a tiny slice of that company and become a 'shareholder'.
  • This slice of the company you own can then be traded with anyone who wants to buy it.
Share price of a company can rise and fall
  • The price is initially set by the firm offering shares.
  • Its price on any given day can be determined by poor financial results, the economic health and so-called 'sentiment', ie, if City buyers think a firm will struggle, its price can fall. 
  • Shares are listed on an 'index'.

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Investing

... is the trading of your money today for a lot more money in the future. It is a high yield over the long term.

What happens to your money

Banks don’t like to give away their money. That mindset is reflected in the interest rates of checking and savings accounts of 0,5% and 0.9% avg. annual interest respectively.

When you deposit your money in the bank, the bank turns around and invests that money at 7% a year or more. After they collect their profit, they give a tiny shaving of it to you.

Portfolio and Diversification
  • Your portfolio reflects your long-term wealth building investment strategy – not the short term. It includes everything you own. Your retirement accounts, your investment accounts, even your home are types of investments.
  • Diversification is a way to describe owning multiple types of investment assets. Diversification is smart because you both protect yourself from failure and position yourself to take advantage of multiple robust methods for building wealth.

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Many life transitions happen in your 30's

From moving up in your career to buying a home. Making smart moves with your money during your 30's can help you achieve future financial success.

Focus on percentage of income saved, not the dollar amount

Over the long term, it's not as much about the dollar amount you save, but the percentage of your income that you dedicate to saving and investing. By focusing on percentages, you can ensure you're always saving more as you earn more. 

Spend time tracking your money

Most people react to their finances. The problem with that is that you rely on chance to have enough money in the bank when you actually need it. Be intentional about your money and spend time reviewing and evaluating it. If you don't, you'll never know if you're moving in the right direction or not.

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Financial planning

 ...is the process which provides you a framework for achieving your life goals in a systematic and planned way by avoiding shocks and surprises.

Try making a budget
  • Create a full inventory of expenses in front of you: Categorize them into fixed and variable; urgent and non-urgent; necessities and luxury; avoidable and unavoidable.
  • You can create a hierarchy of needs and decide which one’s to address first. It’s all about prioritizing. 
  • Accept that you have limited resources and unlimited wants. But you have to manage your resources. The sooner you accept this fact, the better you can control your impulses towards avoidable expenditures.
Maintain a personal balance sheet

It’s a statement wherein you can jot down your assets and liabilities.

  • Pull together your bank statements and other proofs of the liabilities
  • List down your assets like the bank balance, all investments, home value, and value of other assets.
  • Take a sum of all the assets to arrive at the total value of your assets.
  • List down your liabilities the (car loan, home loan, credit card balances etc.)
  • The sum of all the liabilities will show the value of the money you owe.
  • When you subtract the value of liabilities from assets, you get your Net Worth.

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