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5 ways to think big, any day of the week

Choose Specific Goals

Breaking your big picture into specific doable goals will make it much more actionable. Especially if they come with a finite timeline.

Big questions are worth asking but they should be framed in a way that doesn’t feel burdensome or insurmountable. 

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

5 ways to think big, any day of the week

5 ways to think big, any day of the week

https://wavelength.asana.com/workstyle-5-ways-think-big-day-week/

wavelength.asana.com

5

Key Ideas

Ground Yourself In Reality

Brainstorming lets you speculate without restriction, but your ideas must be checked against reality. Be realistic about what options are actionable, and then take the next steps.

Encourage teammates to submit ideas into a single project. Then, have everyone like their favorites and sort them based on that.

Identify First Steps

Big tasks tend to lead to procrastination if we don’t immediately choose the first steps. Study past similar tasks, the necessity for it and how to achieve it.

Having a time and a place when you know you’ll need to present your ideas to an audience is a good way to force you to structure your approach.

Choose Specific Goals

Breaking your big picture into specific doable goals will make it much more actionable. Especially if they come with a finite timeline.

Big questions are worth asking but they should be framed in a way that doesn’t feel burdensome or insurmountable. 

Buddy Up

Find other people to think with and bounce ideas back and forth.

If you’re a manager, buddy with someone who reports to you: teammates who don’t often get the chance to strategize will be energized by the opportunity. This way, your teammates will feel ownership over the conclusions you come to together, and you’ll gain focus and clarity.

Allocate Time To Think

If you just do what’s next on your to-do list, you won’t find time to think about the big picture. 

Block off time on your calendar based on when you’re most creative (morning, afternoon, evening).

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

A Specific Daily To-Do List
  • You should only put things on a to-do list that you have the time and resources to achieve
  • Big goals and projects should be broken down into actionable tasks.
  • ...
An Outsource List
  • Look at everything on your to-do list and ask yourself, ‘Am I the only person who can do this?’
  • Anything that can be given to someone else should be put on an outsource list.
  •  While outsourcing takes the extra time upfront to train someone else on the task, it saves you time later, which can be used to focus on the things you do have to do. 
A Long-Term Goals List

Even if you think it’s too big of a dream but it’s something you want, write it down anyway. 

When you write something down, studies say you’ll be 33% more likely to do it because it sets an intention and puts a goal into motion.

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Melissa Gratias

"Breaking tasks down helps us to see large tasks as more approachable and doable, and reduces our propensity to pr..."

Melissa Gratias
Your Brain Is Limited

So by breaking a larger project down into smaller to-dos, it will be easier for you to identify what step you should take next.

These smaller steps should be written down on a list. 

You Work Better With Specific Goals

The main reasons why specific goals are so powerful:

  • They force us to make a choice to pursue them and exclude anything that’s irrelevant. This increases our focus.
  • They incite effort.
  • They inspire us to be more persistent, as we have a clear idea of what success looks like.
  • They immediately get our wheels turning on the strategies necessary to attain them.

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GTD (Getting Things Done)

GTD is a productivity method for organizing your to-dos, priorities, and schedule in a way that makes them all manageable.

Its 5 principles are:

  • Capture
  • Clarify
  • Org...

"GTD is an organizational system. It doesn't put rules around how you actually do your work. Instead, it focuses on how you capture the work you need to do, organize it, and choose what needs your attention"

"GTD is an organizational system. It doesn't put rules around how you actually do your work. Instead, it focuses on how you capture the work you need to do, organize it, and choose what needs your attention"

GTD: Capture
Capture everything. Your to-dos, your ideas, your recurring tasks, everything. Put it in a pen-and-paper notebook, a to-do app, a planner, whatever you prefer to use to get organized.

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Take A Break

When you’re working on a big project, taking a real break is important for mental productivity. 

Stop the project you’re working on, take some real time away, and come back to it with a ...

Mind Map It

A common reason for feeling stuck on a project is because there’s too much information to process, causing you to lose clarity on your end goal.

Mind mapping is a visual note-taking style to help you get your ideas out on paper. Essentially, you’re making a map of how all of your ideas relate to one another. Start with one central idea, like the overall project goal or just a piece of it. From there, think about the major tasks, goals, or ideas behind the projects.

Try A Change Of Scenery

Getting out of the space you associate with your project can help bring an unexpected shift in your perspective.

Try to get away from the setting you’ve been working in. Do you work from home? Try a new location like a coffee shop, library, or coworking space. Work in an office? Go offsite with your team.

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By the hour

This works well for the chronic procrastinator: those who say they will do it later and then wonder why it never gets done.

Instead of getting overwhelmed, tackle your to-do l...

The Pomodoro Method

Rather than trying to work flat-out, break down your day into a series of work-sprints with a short rest period after each session.

Set a timer for 25 min and focus exclusively on your work for that time, take a 5 min break, and repeat.

Some people find that taking a 5 min break destroys their flow. But it does help to break long complex tasks into a series on manageable sprints.

The 2-minute rule

The 2-minute rule is a strategy for quickly assessing and taking action on small tasks so they don’t take up too much mental energy.

Ask yourself if a task is going to take you 2 minutes or less. If so, just do it.

13 more ideas

The struggle to learn new things
The struggle to learn new things

We tend to learn only the things we were already good at. This creates little bubbles of confidence where we learn, and vast areas we avoid because we’re not sure we can get good at them.

You...

Begin with the use in mind

The first step to learning well is always to ask yourself “why am I learning this?”, because the most effective way to learn is highly dependent on the eventual situation when you will use that information. 

Understand before memorizing

Learning, is much faster when you work with precision over brute force. You’ll remember much more if, instead of trying to memorize, you first seek to understand. Once you “get” something, the act of memorizing it becomes much, much faster.

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The Brain as a Snowy Hill

The snowy hill represents the brain, the people sledding are like the memories, and the trails left behind are the synapses in the brain.

Think of the brain as a hill covered in snow, ...

Memory Palace/The Method of Loci
A method to enhance memory using visualizations with the use of spatial memory.
  1. Choose a place that you know really well.
  2. Plan the route and pick specific locations in your route.
  3. Decide what you want to memorize
  4. Place an object or two, with a mental image, and place them in your memory palace. Exaggerate your images. For example, use nudity or crazy images forcing it to stick in your mind.
  5. Make the image into a mnemonic
Mnemonics

memory device that helps you retain and retrieve information simply with the use of retrieval cues to encode information in the brain.

  1. List the words you want to remember.
  2. Write the initials of each word vertically.
  3. Create a sentence/phrase using the initials.

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Diffuse the fear of being rejected

... by acknowledging and expecting it can and will hurt.

To overcome the sting of rejection, stop trying to avoid feeling that stings. Stop pretending your unaffect...

Interrupting rumination

Make a contract with your partner, family, and friends allowing them to catch you in the throes of verbal diarrhea when you were unfairly treated.

Work out three or four different activities that will distract you and turn your attention to something productive. 

Regulate the number of rejection opportunities

 ... you expose yourself to.

We all have a different threshold of the amount of rejection we can handle. Wisely considering how much more you can handle is essential. 

Before you take another step forward, ask yourself if you have the right resources and support in place to catch you.

3 more ideas

Small Thinking And Big Thinking

Companies, teams and individual achievers are sharply focused on achieving goals. But this focus on completion often limits the scope of the results and stifles innovation.

There is a ...

Create Specified Time For Thinking

Set aside time to tackle a problem and then use the entire time. Don't head for the door after the first good idea, as there may be bigger and better ideas to come.

Encourage Outside Learning

Bring facilitation techniques to encourage participation.

By giving team members time and resources to grow, learn, and explore you get a better quality and wider brainstorming. 

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