Tips to help create an innovative culture

  • Engage and empower the entire team. Everyone in your organization should feel empowered to unleash his or her entrepreneurial spirit.
  • Suspend judgment. Identify “the good” in the ideas instead.
  • “Fail big, but fail soon.” Team members must also know that they have permission to fail.  Sometimes you must move quickly and you can’t always play it safe.
  • Set a good example. Take time to connect, mentor and develop your team members. Inspire them to create, look for new approaches and think outside the box.
  • Pay attention to the details. Designate specific goals, projects, times and expectations. These types of details ensure the innovation process doesn’t turn into a time suck.
  • Don’t forget about the physical environment. The physical environment people are in can influence how they feel, think and interact and can impact the quality and quantity in the innovation process.

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Innovation

...comes with a relentless focus on experience and not being satisfied by “just getting it out.” You must take time to create a complete experience by taking your innovative idea and ruthlessly concentrating on how to reduce it to its essence. 

It’s not just about the cool new feature. It’s more about how you can simplify it to a compelling solution.

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George Bernard Shaw
"The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place."

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Alfred Brendel
The word listen contains the same letters as the word silent.
  1. Be skeptic, meditate, learn from previous mistakes, know what the data and it’s context means, and trust your informed judgment.
  2. Focus on the quality of information you’re getting, not the quantity.
  3. Set a time limit for yourself, and ensure you’re not using your decision-making angst as a procrastination device.
  4. If you see that you prefer familiar and easier choices, ensure they aren’t being reframed to support something you wish was true.
  5. Crisp, clear decisions may seem like the best kind of decisions, but they may cost you time and extra effort when often the details may not even matter.
  6. Forcing yourself to choose may lead to you making high-risk decisions and ignoring alternatives.
  7. Imagine the effort you’re considering was a fantastic success, and then that it was an unequivocal disaster. Then, analyze the reasons for both to find blind spots, dampen excessive optimism, and bridge the gap between short-term and long-term thinking.

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