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Unless You Track Your Progress, Setting Goals Is a Waste of Effort

Own your goals

Once you’ve written down a company or a team goal, two questions arise. Who is responsible for the goal (accountability), and how do you review the results (performance review)?

These goals are designed to try new things, experiment and break old habits. It’s reaching for the moon and landing among the stars.

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Unless You Track Your Progress, Setting Goals Is a Waste of Effort

Unless You Track Your Progress, Setting Goals Is a Waste of Effort

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/321532

entrepreneur.com

4

Key Ideas

Goals should get measured

Two-thirds of senior managers can’t name their firms’ top priorities and more than 80% of small business owners don’t keep track of business goals.

So the problem is that while companies probably have some sort of goals, the progress towards those goals is not measured.

Own your goals

Once you’ve written down a company or a team goal, two questions arise. Who is responsible for the goal (accountability), and how do you review the results (performance review)?

These goals are designed to try new things, experiment and break old habits. It’s reaching for the moon and landing among the stars.

Tracking goals with meetings

Track your progress towards said goal week by week. This is called continuous performance review. 

Weekly status meetings are used in most companies. But you have to be careful with them as they can become pointless very easily if you haven’t set clear goals first.

Having an impact every day

Christina Wodtke, author of “Radical Focus”, has said that success is not checking a box. It’s having an impact. 

Working towards your goals is something you need to do every day and every hour. Only then can you make an impact.

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Cut out the optional

Being overwhelmed may be the new normal, but taking on too many responsibilities may be watering down our overall impact.

Bring back your focus to what matters most. Work on the projects that are the real game-changers. Delegate the discretionary work and eliminate unnecessary meetings.

Design an action plan

Running a thriving business means understanding how to organize your work by importance and knowing when to delegate.

  • Find your sweet spot. When you consider taking on a project, see if it aligns with your purpose and the organization's broader goals. Ask yourself if you're the right person with the right skillset.
  • Automate. As your company grows, use automation tools for low-level work. It also allows your employees to make more meaningful contributions.
  • Set boundaries. Learn to say no to low-level tasks. Set your own limits about what you'll take on.

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Stepping outside the comfort zone

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Every time you take a risk in your business, you face the possibility of failure.

Improv, a theatrical exercise where you improvise a scene with a group of people, essentially mirrors that experience. You have to get used to change fast.

Switch places with the receptionist

If you work behind a closed door, this will be a great exercise for stepping outside your safety zone.

You might have a less productive week, but seeing your workplace from a different perspective will foster an open mind and encourage collaboration.

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Show appreciation

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Encourage your team to keep gratitude journals - writing down a couple of sentences about what you are currently grateful for a couple of times a week. This practice improves productivity by increasing happiness.

Create some privacy

If people can't focus on their work, they are less effective in areas like collaboration and learning, and they are less likely to be satisfied with their jobs.

Workplaces with a balance between individual focus and collaboration are more innovative, creative and encouraging.

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The actual term for a leader who upends the power pyramid to put others' needs first was introduced by Robert Greenleaf in his influential 1970 essay "The Servant As Leader" in 1970.
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  5. Conceptualization. Servant-leading entrepreneurs focus on the big picture and don't get overly distracted by daily operations and short-term goals.
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1:1 meetings
1:1 meetings

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1:1 category

The goal of an effective 1:1 is not an update from your direct report or for you to lay down some instructions. It's a conversation. It's a chance to hear about your direct reports' ideas for your product, their career goals, and possibly their opinion of their performance.

Keep a list of three potential topics ready for discussion. When they say they have nothing to discuss, you can jumpstart the conversation with one of your items.

Manager's best tool

Your most precious resource is your own time and energy. When you spend it on your team, it helps build healthy relationships.

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Goal setting needs active participation
Your goals will not achieve themselves and will require your vigorous participation.

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6 Goal setting tips
  1. Write goals that align with your values. If your career goals aren’t supporting your life goals, you are bound to have a miserable existence.
  2. Set goals that you can control. Unless every aspect of the goal you set is under your control, you have very little likelihood of ever achieving it.
  3. Think big. Set your sights higher than most might believe practicable.
  4. Give yourself time. Start by visualizing where you want to end up in life, then the things you need to get there are pretty easy to plot out.
  5. Plan for success. Do not ask “What if I fail?” but rather “What if I succeed?”
  6. Manage your risks. Success will carry some measure of risk. Consider the risks and weigh them against the reward.
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McKnight’s 15-percent-time rule

This allows employees to spend 15 % of their paid work time daydreaming, doodling or experimenting with ideas that don’t necessarily have to do with their work at the company.

This kind of daydreaming is the genesis of invention and fosters passion for one’s work.

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Leave no holes in your game

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Get used to discomfort

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Understand that it’s possible nothing will go your way, and you’ll have to take a vicious beating. But prepare for a fight and swing to win anyway.

Set up your squad

Although MMA fighters are in a cage by themselves, a team of highly specialized professionals -- from massage therapists to sparring partners -- is essential for them to succeed in the ring.

In business, you need a team similar to an MMA outfit -- one comprised of people who can see things you can’t and make you strong where you are weak.

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What you're grateful for

Writing down the 5 things you're most grateful for every day has tremendous power on the level of your overall happiness.

Keep track of your goals

Writing down your goals and tracking the action steps that are being taken towards them is a great way to identify areas of growth so more can be done to maintain consistent progress, even on a bad day.

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Social currency

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You may not be able to pinpoint what is valuable about you. But everyone has value. You can be worth $1, or you can be worth $100. The decision is yours.

Building valuable relationships

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Before you can build strong connections, understand that connections don’t just happen by chance. Everything you say and do is going to impact your relationships with people, and no one will want to form any type of relationship with you if you don’t demonstrate some type of value (demonstrated by what you think and how consistent you are).

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