Use Your Imagination - Deepstash

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Six Steps To Finding Inspiration

Use Your Imagination

To find inspiration is important to have an active imagination, and that needs to be exercised. Turn on your imagination by doing creative things.

Do things that encourage people to find inspiration through the use of “out of the box” thinking. When you support this kind of thinking by not criticizing it, new inspiration will really start to flow.

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Do Things Differently

Trying new things or old things in different ways is a quick way to change things if nothing excites you and you’re living a repetitive routine. 

Nurture Pleasurable Experiences.

If it doesn’t harm others indulge in the experiences you enjoy, the ones you can’t wait to get involved in.

Things that get you so motivated that you lose track of time while you’re doing it are a good place to start. Nurturing those pleasurable experiences will help your inspiration to flourish and grow.

See The Wonders Of Life

Most people have things they are insecure about and unresolved childhood issues. Those tend to dampen enthusiasm and inspiration.

You can change this by deliberately focusing on the wonderful things of life and being mindful of what you do. This lets you see things differently and reframe life choices more positively.

Viktor Frankl

"In some ways suffering ceases to be suffering at the moment it finds a meaning."

Viktor Frankl
Moving forward

At this time in history, many people are wondering whether we will have a life again. Will we recover with dignity?

Science suggests that we will do more than recover: we will show immense capacity for resiliency and growth.

From Resilience to Growth

Resilience is the ability to maintain a relatively stable and healthy level of psychological and physical functioning during and after a very traumatic event.

Studies reveal that resilience is actually common and can be attained through multiple unexpected routes. Studies further show that the majority of trauma survivors do not develop PTSD, and most report unexpected growth from their experience.

Journaling approaches
  • The Gratitude Journal: Simply write about something that you’re grateful for.
  • Morning Pages: Before starting work each day, write 3 pages, long-hand, of anything that crosses your mind, to clear your head.
  • The Goal Journal: Incorporating your goals into a daily journal is a huge step to getting them done.
  • The Values Journal: Identify the values that are important to you. Then write about how the events of your day connect back to your values.
  • The Curiosity Journal: Challenge yourself to write about one thing every day that made you stop and ask a question.
What you write, you learn

The key to learning is to stop passively consuming information and start actively engaging with the ideas we encounter.

One effective way researchers have found to reinforce learning is through reflective writing: It promotes the brain’s attentive focus, boosts long-term memory, illuminates patterns and gives the brain time for reflection.

What you write, you control
  • Recording your thoughts in a medium outside your own head helps your mind to become quieter: It stops returning to the same worn-out mental loops over and over. 
  • When you recount and reflect upon your thoughts and experiences you are, in effect, telling your own story. Journaling helps us clarify, edit, and find new meaning in these narratives.