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5 Ways To Share Your Professional Expertise And 4 Reasons You Should

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  • You’re automatically afforded a certain level of authority. It seems strange, but writers are presumed to be experts. Just be sure that whatever you put into writing is something you stand by wholeheartedly and are proud of.
  • This can quickly elevate your professional visibility and shape your reputation as a leader in your field. 

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

5 Ways To Share Your Professional Expertise And 4 Reasons You Should

5 Ways To Share Your Professional Expertise And 4 Reasons You Should

https://www.forbes.com/sites/work-in-progress/2013/07/25/5-ways-to-share-your-professional-expertise-and-4-reasons-you-should/

forbes.com

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Key Ideas

Share Your Expertise

  • Nothing helps deepen knowledge as effectively as sharing it.
  • It expands what you know. Sharing your expertise means inviting a new conversation. 
  • It establishes your reputation as an authority.
  • It increases your professional value. When your expertise helps the entire team, you become a more valuable part of it. 

Become a Mentor

  • There’s no shortage of young professionals looking for guidance. Share the hard earned lessons you’ve collected over the years.
  • Keep your eyes, ears, and mind open. The best part about mentorship is that when it’s a strong partnership, both people learn equally. 

Write

  • You’re automatically afforded a certain level of authority. It seems strange, but writers are presumed to be experts. Just be sure that whatever you put into writing is something you stand by wholeheartedly and are proud of.
  • This can quickly elevate your professional visibility and shape your reputation as a leader in your field. 

Train Others

Training others will help boost your public speaking skills and position you as an authority. Just like writing, standing in front of a room creates automatic credibility.

Remember not to talk “down” to people; part of your role is to tap the wisdom in the Room. 

Be a Resource

Each and every day, you likely have something worthwhile to share that could be beneficial to your colleagues. Don't keep these useful pieces of information to yourself.

Take the Lead

If you have special expertise that could be beneficial to a particular task or project, don’t be afraid to take the reins.

Don’t make people beg for your help or insight. If you have something to contribute, get out front. 

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