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This is how you should answer "What are your strengths?"

"I’m a good problem solver"

Focusing on problem-solving implies that a candidate possesses secondary skills including critical thinking, strategic thinking, and leadership.

Demonstrate your problem-solving abilities by sharing the results of the problems you solved. 

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This is how you should answer "What are your strengths?"

This is how you should answer "What are your strengths?"

https://www.fastcompany.com/90234552/this-is-the-best-answer-to-what-are-your-strengths

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

"I’m a good problem solver"

Focusing on problem-solving implies that a candidate possesses secondary skills including critical thinking, strategic thinking, and leadership.

Demonstrate your problem-solving abilities by sharing the results of the problems you solved. 

"I’m a good communicator"

Communication encompasses not only speaking skills, but also your ability to lead, critique, and ask for help. Being adept in various communication methods also shows emotional intelligence.

"I have strong time management skills"

Time management is more than just completing tasks on time. An employer cares about how you spend the time leading up to a deadline as well.

Demonstrate your strength in this area by sharing how you prioritize your daily tasks.
Using the 80/20 rule for project prioritization can show how you best schedule your time to give your full attention to critical project tasks.

"I’m honest"

Hiring managers want to know that you will be trustworthy in your position.

To demonstrate your honesty, consider sharing a time when you made a mistake and how you resolved it. It will show your ability to handle difficult situations, and the ability to learn from it.

"I’m very determined"

Determination shows that the applicant knows what they’re looking for in their next role and beyond. 

Demonstrate your determination by sharing where you see yourself in the future. Hiring managers want to see applicants who aren’t just looking for longevity with a company; they’re searching for someone who has future plans that they are working towards.

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The reason for the question

Interviewers ask questions like "tell me about yourself "  to determine if you're qualified to do the work and if you will fit in with the team.

How to Answer the Question

It might be a good idea to share something about yourself that is doesn't relate directly to your career. 

For example, interests like running might represent that you are healthy and energetic. Pursuits like being an avid reader might showcase your intellectual leaning. Volunteer work will demonstrate your commitment to the welfare of your community.

The “present-past-future” formula

This is a simple formula to construct your response.

  • Start with a short overview of where you are now (which could include your current job along with a reference to a personal hobby or passion).
  • Reference how you got to where you are (you could mention education, or an important experience, internship or volunteer experience).
  • Finish by describing a probable goal for the future.

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Identifying your workplace strengths

Whenever you're asked what your workplace strengths are, you’ll want to be able to identify them.

There are four primary workplace strengths. These are the essential strengths to getting...

Envision strength
Some people have an “envision strength." 

These folks are visionaries who get energy and solve problems by asking and answering the question, where do we intend to go and why?’ It is common to find these strengths with strategists, marketers, and CEOs.

Characteristics of the “Envision” workplace strength
  • Thinking strategically: The ability to see past today’s issues and focus on a longer term destination.
  • Setting a visionary destination: The ability to establish a positive future in the minds of others that doesn’t exist today.
  • Thinking inventively: The ability to conceptualize a working solution that can ultimately convert into a tangible product-service offering.
  • Generating imaginative ideas: The ability to see and articulate possibilities that are not purely grounded in experience.
  • Thinking creatively: The ability to offer new thoughts on subject areas that others have not considered.
  • Pioneering new ideas: The ability to create a new line of thought that has not yet been proven in practice.
  • Brainstorming new ideas: The ability to work with others to co-create new ideas and new solutions.

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What you should not say
  • Starting with something personal like family or hobbies, or launching into your life story.
  • Sharing the problems with your current job.
  • Summarizing your resume, point-by-point....
Craft an elevator pitch
  • Spend some time reviewing the job description in the recruitment ad for the position and research the company.
  • Prepare a short script that highlights the skills, strengths and expertise you have that make you especially qualified for this particular position. 
  • Explain the reasons you’re applying for this particular job. Focus on career-related motivations.
Your purpose to the question

Your purpose to the question "tell me about yourself" is to give just enough details of yourself to spark the interest of the interviewer.

Answering this question gives you a great opportunity to spotlight the skills and experience that make you the ideal candidate for the job.

Delegation

In a work setting, it means the transfer of responsibility for a task from a manager to a subordinate. 

The decision to delegate is usually made by the manager. However, sometimes...

Top Delegation Skills
  • Communication: explain what the task is, what the expectations are, and listen to any questions and concerns.
  • Giving Feedback: provide clear feedback on what they did well, what they struggled with, and why.
  • Training and Assessment of Tasks:  make sure your staff has the skills and abilities necessary to perform the task. This might require some training.
  • Trust: Lay out clear expectations, and provide feedback, but do not micromanage while the employee works on the task.
The Interviewer’s Perspective

When the interviewer asks you, “Tell me about yourself”, he is hoping this question will get you talking. It will give him a first impression of you, and set the tone for the inte...

How Not to Answer
  • Prepare a brief summary of the high points of each of your past positions, but do not turn it into a very long monologue that makes the interviewer glaze over with information overload.
  • You do not have to brag, but don't rely on the interviewer to see past your humble exterior and figure out how great you are. Find a way to present yourself to your full advantage.
  • This is not the time to talk about all your personal details. Focus on who you are as a professional.
  • Because this question can be interpreted in many ways, do not be overwhelmed by it. Delve right in with your prepared answers.
Your elevator pitch
You need a short summary of yourself as a job candidate. Keep it focused, ideally less than a minute, and no more than two minutes.
  • Address what your primary selling points are for this job. The number of years of experience or special skill.  Focus on the qualifications in the job description and how you meet and exceed it.
  • Explain why you are interested in this position. 

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Answers To Common Interview Questions
  1. Can you tell me a little bit about yourself? Don’t tell your life story; answer clearly and concisely. Focus on professional accomplishments.
  2. Why should we hire you over the other appl...
The Smartest Way To Answer Interview Questions

The interviewer is likely looking for someone who can solve problems, has good interpersonal skills and the ability to get things done using good judgment and effectiveness. 

Not every question lets you show skills easily, so reframing a question to get to the answer you want to communicate might be the best way to do so.

Why Interviewers Ask It

This introductory question serves as an icebreaker to lend an easy flow to the conversation. It helps the recruiter to get to know you in terms of hard and soft skills.

It’s a great op...

How to build your response
  • Present: Talk a little bit about what your current role is, the scope of it, and possibly a recent achievement.
  • Past: Tell the interviewer how you got there and/or mention a past experience that’s relevant to the job and company you’re applying for.
  • Future: Continue with what you’re looking to do next and why you’re interested in this job.
You do not have to respond in this order. Tweak it to suit you. Make sure to tie it to the job and company.
Tailor Your Answer

Interviewers want to know how your answer about yourself is relevant to the position and company you’re applying for.

This is an opportunity to articulate why you’re interested and how your objective fulfills their goals. In order to do that, spend some time researching the company. If your answers resonate with them, it shows that you really understand the role.

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Standing out
Standing out

Despite the high unemployment rates during the pandemic, companies are still hiring. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, companies employed 5.2 million people in April.

The differe...

A resume that stands out

A resume that stands out has been tailored specifically to each job and company you're pursuing.

If you have a job description, rewrite your resume to ensure you're highlighting the necessary skills and achievements the hiring manager is seeking. Use your keywords to write a story of why you're the best candidate for the job.

Show your impact areas

Hiring managers want to see that you can make a positive difference. That means you have to do your homework. Consider how the needs of the company intersect with your greatest wins and be prepared to talk about them.

Make it easy for them to understand what you can do for the team.

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Your resume

Your resume in a job application is essentially the document that’s going to market you to potential employers.

Companies are looking for a particular set of skills or qualifications. If t...

The Headline Summary

Your resume should start with a "headline summary." It is a very brief summary of what you have to offer as a job candidate. It should be less than two sentences:

  • It should advertise your abilities.
  • Be broad enough that you can elaborate on them in the rest of the resume.
  • Mention anything specific that you know the employer is looking for or any substantial life achievement relevant to the job that will make you stand out as a candidate.
Work Experience
  • Describe your work experience in a series of lists. Lists are easier to view than written sentences.
  • Describe how, in the past, your contributions in a company have led to marked improvements. Be relevant.
  • Make sure you address all relevant gaps and time frames when you describe your work experience, for example, self-employment, or school or family obligations. It can be a big red flag for employers when they notice a significant gap in your employment history.

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