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4 Myths About Psychotherapy You Should Know Before You Go

Therapists Are Not Paid Friends

A therapist should be someone you trust will keep your secrets, and hopefully someone whose company you enjoy, as finding a good fit is an important part of successful therapy.

But your therapist is a professional who trained to perform therapy and is bound by a strict code of ethics requiring them to keep your best interest as a priority. As such, they won’t disclose much about themselves unless it’s to assist with your growth.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

4 Myths About Psychotherapy You Should Know Before You Go

4 Myths About Psychotherapy You Should Know Before You Go

https://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/4-myths-about-psychotherapy-you-should-know-before-you-go-0706165

goodtherapy.org

4

Key Ideas

Therapy Couch

There is a common misconception that going to therapy, you will lie down on a couch, staring at the ceiling, and talk while an emotionless professional sits near you and writes on a notepad.

Most therapists do have couches in their offices. But many people in therapy choose to sit and talk to their therapist, who often responds. 

Duration Of Therapy 

Some methods of psychotherapy and complex issues may take some time, but many interventions are shorter. Also, many choose to stay in therapy after the issue that brought them has been addressed to better understand themselves and their thoughts.

Therapy Is Not A Weakness

Many consider therapy but worried about its stigma, end up neglecting their health. Taking responsibility for one’s health takes courage and strength. And the payoff, your ultimate well-being, is its own reward—both for you and your therapist.

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